Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron’s incurable European headache (Financial Times)

This is where the irresistible force of rising Tory europhobia meets the immovable object of geopolitical reality, writes Philip Stephens.

2. It’s too early for the Tories to assume defeat is inevitable in 2015 (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron could be a transformative leader if he had more faith in his power to change minds, says Fraser Nelson.

3. Algeria spills more blood (Guardian)

The violent end to this standoff is only the start of a new chapter in the country's savage history, writes Nabila Ramdani.

4. Don’t reject a referendum, Ed. Fast-track it (Times) (£)

The Labour leader should seize his chance to appeal to British business and voters, says Philip Collins. He must offer an in-out vote now.

5. Mali is not a global conflict. It doesn't require a global response (Independent)

The notion of a global threat from a revived al-Qa'ida should be familiar by now; it's the same flawed reasoning the led the US to launch its "war against terror", says Adrian Hamilton.

6. A living wage, or a much higher minimum wage, is worth paying (Daily Telegraph)

As City profits soar, the low-skilled, service areas of the economy continue to suffer a fall in income, writes Jeremy Warner. Radical action might avoid a social catastrophe.

7. A funny way of firing up the locomotive (Financial Times)

Now and in the interwar period, austerity policies have often failed in their own terms as they have made deficits worse, writes Samuel Brittan.

8. Mr Cameron and the speech that never was (Daily Mail)

The Prime Minister is confronting one of the most crucial issues of our times while Ed Miliband has nothing useful to say, argues a Daily Mail editorial.

9. Hugh Gaitskell: New Labour's old roots (Guardian)

Tony Blair never acknowledged the influence of his most like-minded predecessor, who died 50 years ago this week, says a Guardian editorial.

10. Why today’s American presidents need a third term (Independent)

There are compelling reasons why two four-year terms may not be enough for a competent and popular US president today, writes Mary Dejevsky.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.