Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband needs to be bolder on EU and immigration (Daily Telegraph)

Instead of offering a strong lead, the Labour Party leader risks giving the initiative to the Tories, says Mary Riddell.

2. Europe: no more talk of in-or-out. Let's think opt-outs (Guardian)

The EU treaties are not fit for purpose, but leaving makes no sense, says Simon Jenkins. Negotiation is possible without risking free trade.

3. Don’t be the PM who takes us out of Europe (Times) (£)

David Miliband imagines what advice John Major might offer David Cameron.

4. Japan should rethink its stimulus (Financial Times)

The real problem is a return to deflation and an overvalued currency, says Adam Posen.

5. The big chains simply cannot rival the choice or the price of online retailers (Daily Mail)

The high street as we knew it, and perhaps in some cases even loved it, is becoming history, writes Simon Heffer.

6. Towards a fairer capitalism: let's burst the 1% bubble (Guardian)

Talk of a more moral capitalism is just hot air unless we rehabilitate and reward the idea of value creation, writes Mariana Mazzucato.

7. Don't let HMV drown in the Amazon (Independent)

A scaled-down operation that adopts more of the "niche" principles of modern business thinking could yet thrive, says an Independent editorial.

8. Berlin slows down (Financial Times)

It is time for German companies to end pay restraint, argues an FT editorial.

9. The BA Christian case was judged rightly, and a true test of tolerance (Guardian)

Nadia Eweida's religious reasons for wearing a cross at work should not have been trampled on by BA's uniform policy, argues Andrew Brown.

10. We should not pay a penny of RBS’s fraud fine (Independent)

The cost, which could rise above £300m, should come out of the bankers' bonus pool, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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