Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband needs to be bolder on EU and immigration (Daily Telegraph)

Instead of offering a strong lead, the Labour Party leader risks giving the initiative to the Tories, says Mary Riddell.

2. Europe: no more talk of in-or-out. Let's think opt-outs (Guardian)

The EU treaties are not fit for purpose, but leaving makes no sense, says Simon Jenkins. Negotiation is possible without risking free trade.

3. Don’t be the PM who takes us out of Europe (Times) (£)

David Miliband imagines what advice John Major might offer David Cameron.

4. Japan should rethink its stimulus (Financial Times)

The real problem is a return to deflation and an overvalued currency, says Adam Posen.

5. The big chains simply cannot rival the choice or the price of online retailers (Daily Mail)

The high street as we knew it, and perhaps in some cases even loved it, is becoming history, writes Simon Heffer.

6. Towards a fairer capitalism: let's burst the 1% bubble (Guardian)

Talk of a more moral capitalism is just hot air unless we rehabilitate and reward the idea of value creation, writes Mariana Mazzucato.

7. Don't let HMV drown in the Amazon (Independent)

A scaled-down operation that adopts more of the "niche" principles of modern business thinking could yet thrive, says an Independent editorial.

8. Berlin slows down (Financial Times)

It is time for German companies to end pay restraint, argues an FT editorial.

9. The BA Christian case was judged rightly, and a true test of tolerance (Guardian)

Nadia Eweida's religious reasons for wearing a cross at work should not have been trampled on by BA's uniform policy, argues Andrew Brown.

10. We should not pay a penny of RBS’s fraud fine (Independent)

The cost, which could rise above £300m, should come out of the bankers' bonus pool, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

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How will Labour handle the Trident vote?

Shadow cabinet ministers have been promised a free vote and dismiss suggestions that the party should abstain. 

At some point this year MPs will vote on whether Trident should be renewed. It is politics, rather than policy, that will likely determine the timing. With Labour more divided on the nuclear question than any other, the Tories aim to inflict maximum damage on the opposition. Some want an early vote in order to wreak havoc ahead of the May elections, while others suggest waiting until autumn in the hope that the unilateralist Jeremy Corbyn may have changed party policy by then.  

Urged at PMQs by Conservative defence select committee chair Julian Lewis to "do the statesmanlike thing" and hold the vote "as soon as possible", Cameron replied: "We should have the vote when we need to have the vote and that is exactly what we will do" - a reply that does little to settle the matter. 

As I've reported before, frontbenchers have been privately assured by Corbyn that they and other Labour MPs will have a free vote on the issue. Just seven of the shadow cabinet's 31 members support unilateral disarmament, with Tom Watson, Andy Burnham, Hilary Benn and Angela Eagle among those committed to Trident renewal. But interviewed on the Today programme yesterday, after her gruelling PLP appearance, Emily Thornberry suggested that Labour may advise MPs to abstain. Noting that there was no legal requirement for the Commons to vote on the decision (and that MPs did so in 2007), she denounced the Tories for "playing games". But the possibility that Labour could ignore the vote was described to me by one shadow cabinet member as "madness". He warned that Labour would appear entirely unfit to govern if it abstained on a matter of national security. 

But with Trident renewal a fait accompli, owing to the Conservatives' majority, the real battle is to determine Labour's stance at the next election. Sources on both sides are doubtful that Corbyn will have the support required to change policy at the party conference, with the trade unions, including the pro-Trident Unite and GMB, holding 50 per cent of the vote. And Trident supporters also speak of their success against the left in constituency delegate elections. One described the Corbyn-aligned Momentum as a "clickocracy" that ultimately failed to turn out when required. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.