Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read commment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. US has been let down by its leadership (Financial Times)

A deal that extends unsustainable tax cuts for 98 per cent of Americans is no victory, says Nouriel Roubini.

2. Iain Duncan Smith's polemic is politics at its most cynical (Guardian)

How does the secretary of state's conceit, that in-work benefit claimants are fraudsters, serve the public interest, asks Zoe Williams.

3. Cosy up to China – are you sure about that? (Times) (£)

It’s easy to envy the boom, but as Beijing’s influence spreads around the globe we must confront the human cost, says David Aaronovitch.

4. We can end the elderly care lottery (Guardian)

Means-testing winter fuel payments could prevent old people losing their assets and their dignity, argues Paul Burstow.

5. Let taxpayers share rail fare pain (Independent)

More effort must be made to spread the investment costs more widely, says an Independent editorial.

6. Britain would vote to stay in the EU (Financial Times)

The UK electorate would almost certainly opt for the status quo, writes Gideon Rachman.

7. Fighting back against the left-wing guerrillas (Daily Telegraph)

Foes of public sector reform are waging war at a local level – they must be roundly beaten, says Sean Worth.

8. America could still go over the cliff — and take the rest of us with it (Daily Mail)

The American people, and, indeed, the rest of the world, urgently need to revise their view of how economically strong this ailing superpower really is, says Simon Heffer.

9. Christopher Martin-Jenkins: we're all the poorer for his passing (Daily Telegraph)

Our institutions need many more 'outsiders’ with the enthusiasm and knowledge of Christopher Martin-Jenkins, says Peter Oborne.

10. Cosmetic surgery is bad. That women feel the need for it is worse (Independent)

Now even the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is demanding change, writes Mary Ann Sieghart.

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Voters are turning against Brexit but the Lib Dems aren't benefiting

Labour's pro-Brexit stance is not preventing it from winning the support of Remainers. Will that change?

More than a year after the UK voted for Brexit, there has been little sign of buyer's remorse. The public, including around a third of Remainers, are largely of the view that the government should "get on with it".

But as real wages are squeezed (owing to the Brexit-linked inflationary spike) there are tentative signs that the mood is changing. In the event of a second referendum, an Opinium/Observer poll found, 47 per cent would vote Remain, compared to 44 per cent for Leave. Support for a repeat vote is also increasing. Forty one per cent of the public now favour a second referendum (with 48 per cent opposed), compared to 33 per cent last December. 

The Liberal Democrats have made halting Brexit their raison d'être. But as public opinion turns, there is no sign they are benefiting. Since the election, Vince Cable's party has yet to exceed single figures in the polls, scoring a lowly 6 per cent in the Opinium survey (down from 7.4 per cent at the election). 

What accounts for this disparity? After their near-extinction in 2015, the Lib Dems remain either toxic or irrelevant to many voters. Labour, by contrast, despite its pro-Brexit stance, has hoovered up Remainers (55 per cent back Jeremy Corbyn's party). 

In some cases, this reflects voters' other priorities. Remainers are prepared to support Labour on account of the party's stances on austerity, housing and education. Corbyn, meanwhile, is a eurosceptic whose internationalism and pro-migration reputation endear him to EU supporters. Other Remainers rewarded Labour MPs who voted against Article 50, rebelling against the leadership's stance. 

But the trend also partly reflects ignorance. By saying little on the subject of Brexit, Corbyn and Labour allowed Remainers to assume the best. Though there is little evidence that voters will abandon Corbyn over his EU stance, the potential exists.

For this reason, the proposal of a new party will continue to recur. By challenging Labour over Brexit, without the toxicity of Lib Dems, it would sharpen the choice before voters. Though it would not win an election, a new party could force Corbyn to soften his stance on Brexit or to offer a second referendum (mirroring Ukip's effect on the Conservatives).

The greatest problem for the project is that it lacks support where it counts: among MPs. For reasons of tribalism and strategy, there is no emergent "Gang of Four" ready to helm a new party. In the absence of a new convulsion, the UK may turn against Brexit without the anti-Brexiteers benefiting. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.