Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Biden and McConnell's self-congratulation is unjustified (Guardian)

The fiscal cliff agreement is a jerry-built compromise that neither deals with the slump nor faces up to the long term, says a Guardian editorial.

2. Make nominal spending the new target (Financial Times)

As long as nominal GDP growth is stable, core inflation will remain well anchored, writes Scott Sumner.

3. Carping Labour must come clean about cuts (Times) (£)

The real divide is between those who offer leadership and those who offer only dissent, says Nick Clegg.

4. Now China's new leaders will have to work hard (Guardian)

How they deal with future economic challenges and the Tibet crisis will test whether the claim to wise meritocracy is credible, says Isabel Hilton.

5. America refuses to face up to reality (Daily Telegraph)

As the powerhouse of the world economy, America cannot continue to live in denial and expect to maintain its dominant role, says a Telegraph leader.

6. Housing is in crisis, yet the coalition does nothing (Guardian)

Scotland is taking the lead in housing the homeless, writes Lynsey Hanley. If only Westminster did likewise.

7. Africa is hooked on growth (Financial Times)

The success is not continent-wide but the best-managed countries are pulling it off, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

8. IDS’s rebirth is one of the wonders of the age (Independent)

Sacked by his party in 2003 on the twin grounds of being preternaturally incompetent and sensationally dim, Duncan Smith has reinvented himself, writes Matthew Norman.

9. The Commonwealth has never been stronger (Daily Telegraph)

This great institution promotes trade and freedom – no wonder there’s a queue to join, writes Hugo Swire.

10. We’re obese for the same reason we’re in debt – we prefer to forget the future (Independent)

Putting off hard tasks and difficult decisions costs humanity dearly, says Christina Patterson.

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The Future of the Left: trade unions are more important than ever

Trade unions are under threat - and without them, the left has no future. 

Not accepting what you're given, when what you're given isn't enough, is the heart of trade unionism.

Workers having the means to change their lot - by standing together and organising is bread and butter for the labour movement - and the most important part? That 'lightbulb moment' when a group of workers realise they don't have to accept the injustice of their situation and that they have the means to change it.

That's what happened when a group of low-paid hospital workers organised a demonstration outside their hospital last week. As more of their colleagues clocked out and joined them on their picket, thart lightbulb went on.

When they stood together, proudly waving their union flags, singing a rhythmic chant and raising their homemade placards demanding a living wage they knew they had organised the collective strength needed to win.

The GMB union members, predominantly BAME women, work for Aramark, an American multinational outsourcing provider. They are hostesses and domestics in the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, a mental health trust with sites across south London.

Like the nurses and doctors, they work around vulnerable patients and are subject to verbal and in some cases physical abuse. Unlike the nurses and doctors their pay is determined by the private contractor that employs them - for many of these staff that means statutory sick pay, statutory annual leave entitlement and as little as £7.38 per hour.

This is little more than George Osborne's new 'Living Wage' of £7.20 per hour as of April.

But these workers aren't fighting for a living wage set by government or even the Living Wage Foundation - they are fighting for a genuine living wage. The GMB union and Class think tank have calculated that a genuine living wage of £10ph an hour as part of a full time contract removes the need for in work benefits.

As the TUC launches its 'Heart Unions' week of action against the trade union bill today, the Aramark workers will be receiving ballot papers to vote on whether or not they want to strike to win their demands.

These workers are showing exactly why we need to 'Heart Unions' more than ever, because it is the labour movement and workers like these that need to start setting the terms of the real living wage debate. It is campaigns like this, low-paid, in some cases precariously employed and often women workers using their collective strength to make demands on their employer with a strategy for winning those demands that will begin to deliver a genuine living wage.

It is also workers like these that the Trade Union Bill seeks to silence. In many ways it may succeed, but in many other ways workers can still win.

Osborne wants workers to accept what they're given - a living wage on his terms. He wants to stop the women working for Aramark from setting an example to other workers about what can be achieved.

There is no doubting that achieving higher ballot turn outs, restrictions on picket lines and most worryingly the use of agency workers to cover strikers work will make campaigns like these harder. But I refuse to accept they are insurmountable, or that good, solid organisation of working people doesn't have the ability to prevail over even the most authoritarian of legislation.

As the TUC launch their Heart Unions week of action against the bill these women are showing us how the labour movement can reclaim the demands for a genuine living wage. They also send a message to all working people, the message that the Tories fear the most, that collective action can still win and that attempts to silence workers can still be defeated.