Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Biden and McConnell's self-congratulation is unjustified (Guardian)

The fiscal cliff agreement is a jerry-built compromise that neither deals with the slump nor faces up to the long term, says a Guardian editorial.

2. Make nominal spending the new target (Financial Times)

As long as nominal GDP growth is stable, core inflation will remain well anchored, writes Scott Sumner.

3. Carping Labour must come clean about cuts (Times) (£)

The real divide is between those who offer leadership and those who offer only dissent, says Nick Clegg.

4. Now China's new leaders will have to work hard (Guardian)

How they deal with future economic challenges and the Tibet crisis will test whether the claim to wise meritocracy is credible, says Isabel Hilton.

5. America refuses to face up to reality (Daily Telegraph)

As the powerhouse of the world economy, America cannot continue to live in denial and expect to maintain its dominant role, says a Telegraph leader.

6. Housing is in crisis, yet the coalition does nothing (Guardian)

Scotland is taking the lead in housing the homeless, writes Lynsey Hanley. If only Westminster did likewise.

7. Africa is hooked on growth (Financial Times)

The success is not continent-wide but the best-managed countries are pulling it off, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

8. IDS’s rebirth is one of the wonders of the age (Independent)

Sacked by his party in 2003 on the twin grounds of being preternaturally incompetent and sensationally dim, Duncan Smith has reinvented himself, writes Matthew Norman.

9. The Commonwealth has never been stronger (Daily Telegraph)

This great institution promotes trade and freedom – no wonder there’s a queue to join, writes Hugo Swire.

10. We’re obese for the same reason we’re in debt – we prefer to forget the future (Independent)

Putting off hard tasks and difficult decisions costs humanity dearly, says Christina Patterson.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland