Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On gay marriage, Cameron and Osborne have reached the right decision - for the wrong reason (Independent)

History shows that acting for strategic reasons only can backfire, says Steve Richards.

2. There's more to this Scargill chic than mere fashion nostalgia (Guardian)

The high-street retailer's new collection of clothes dedicated to the former miners' leader reminds us of times when workers were taken more seriously, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

3. America’s drone war is out of control (Financial Times)

Unmanned strikes to kill suspected terrorists set a dangerous precedent, says Gideon Rachman.

4. Britain could end these tax scams by hitting the big four (Guardian)

The spiders spinning the web of avoidance are the major accountancy firms who make billions from the public purse, writes Polly Toynbee.

5. Leaders’ debates are good for democracy (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister should not be allowed to wriggle out of the debates, argues a Telegraph editorial.

6. Spineless Labour need to seize on Tory's smash and grab on families (Daily Mirror)

The Chancellor is cheating the very Britons he claims to champion, says Kevin Maguire.

7. This £20m cheque is an historic turning point (Times) (£)

We need to open up the tax affairs of the FTSE 100 and pursue avoiders more rapidly, writes Margaret Hodge.

8. The time has come to decriminalise all drugs (Independent)

It is time to acknowledge that the war that could never be won is now categorically lost, says an Independent leader.

9. Politicians miss the point of business (Financial Times)

Ministers need to remember that business exists to make a profit within the law, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. On drugs, the law lags behind public opinion (Daily Telegraph)

The Home Office won’t admit it, but most Britons would scrap the ban on cannabis, says Philip Johnston.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.