Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On gay marriage, Cameron and Osborne have reached the right decision - for the wrong reason (Independent)

History shows that acting for strategic reasons only can backfire, says Steve Richards.

2. There's more to this Scargill chic than mere fashion nostalgia (Guardian)

The high-street retailer's new collection of clothes dedicated to the former miners' leader reminds us of times when workers were taken more seriously, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

3. America’s drone war is out of control (Financial Times)

Unmanned strikes to kill suspected terrorists set a dangerous precedent, says Gideon Rachman.

4. Britain could end these tax scams by hitting the big four (Guardian)

The spiders spinning the web of avoidance are the major accountancy firms who make billions from the public purse, writes Polly Toynbee.

5. Leaders’ debates are good for democracy (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister should not be allowed to wriggle out of the debates, argues a Telegraph editorial.

6. Spineless Labour need to seize on Tory's smash and grab on families (Daily Mirror)

The Chancellor is cheating the very Britons he claims to champion, says Kevin Maguire.

7. This £20m cheque is an historic turning point (Times) (£)

We need to open up the tax affairs of the FTSE 100 and pursue avoiders more rapidly, writes Margaret Hodge.

8. The time has come to decriminalise all drugs (Independent)

It is time to acknowledge that the war that could never be won is now categorically lost, says an Independent leader.

9. Politicians miss the point of business (Financial Times)

Ministers need to remember that business exists to make a profit within the law, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. On drugs, the law lags behind public opinion (Daily Telegraph)

The Home Office won’t admit it, but most Britons would scrap the ban on cannabis, says Philip Johnston.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.