Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On gay marriage, Cameron and Osborne have reached the right decision - for the wrong reason (Independent)

History shows that acting for strategic reasons only can backfire, says Steve Richards.

2. There's more to this Scargill chic than mere fashion nostalgia (Guardian)

The high-street retailer's new collection of clothes dedicated to the former miners' leader reminds us of times when workers were taken more seriously, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

3. America’s drone war is out of control (Financial Times)

Unmanned strikes to kill suspected terrorists set a dangerous precedent, says Gideon Rachman.

4. Britain could end these tax scams by hitting the big four (Guardian)

The spiders spinning the web of avoidance are the major accountancy firms who make billions from the public purse, writes Polly Toynbee.

5. Leaders’ debates are good for democracy (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister should not be allowed to wriggle out of the debates, argues a Telegraph editorial.

6. Spineless Labour need to seize on Tory's smash and grab on families (Daily Mirror)

The Chancellor is cheating the very Britons he claims to champion, says Kevin Maguire.

7. This £20m cheque is an historic turning point (Times) (£)

We need to open up the tax affairs of the FTSE 100 and pursue avoiders more rapidly, writes Margaret Hodge.

8. The time has come to decriminalise all drugs (Independent)

It is time to acknowledge that the war that could never be won is now categorically lost, says an Independent leader.

9. Politicians miss the point of business (Financial Times)

Ministers need to remember that business exists to make a profit within the law, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. On drugs, the law lags behind public opinion (Daily Telegraph)

The Home Office won’t admit it, but most Britons would scrap the ban on cannabis, says Philip Johnston.

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The Brexit deal and all the other things Liam Fox finds “easiest in human history”

The international trade secretary is an experienced man. 

On the day of a report warning a no deal Brexit could result in prices rises, blocked ports and legal chaos, international trade secretary Liam Fox emerged to reassure the nation. 

He told BBC Radio 4: "If you think about it, the free trade agreement that we will have to come to with the European Union should be one of the easiest in human history.” 

Since his colleague, Brexit secretary David Davis, described Brexit negotiations as more complicated than the moon landings, this suggests we are truly lucky in the calibre of our top negotiating team. 

Just for clarification, here is the full Davis-Fox definition of easy:

Super easy: Tudor divorce

All Henry VIII had to do was break away from the Catholic Church, kickstart the Reformation, fuel religious wars in Europe, and he was married to his second wife. And his third, fourth, fifth and sixth. Plus the Henry VIII clauses are really handy for bypassing parliament in 2017.

Easy: Tea Act 1773

American colonialists were buying smuggled tea, when they could have bought East India tea instead. Luckily, the British Prime Minister Lord North, found a way to deal with the problem in a single bill. Sorted.

Bit tricky: Appeasement

So what if Neville Chamberlain had never been on an airplane before? It's hardly a moon landing. And he got peace in our time. Although he was forced to resign in 1940. Not quite as easy as he thought. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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