Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Egypt's hopes betrayed by Morsi (Guardian)

Bread, freedom and social justice were the demands of the revolution, writes Ahdaf Soueif. Instead Mohamed Morsi delivered bloodshed.

2. Against George Osborne's war on the poor (Independent)

The Chancellor used his Autumn Statement to attack many of the most vulnerable people in our society, says Owen Jones.

3. Conservatives should embrace gay marriage (Times) (£)

Angry voices in the Church and the party are out of touch with the country, says Tim Montgomerie. David Cameron must stand firm.

4. Why we are calling for an end to the war on drugs (Guardian)

The home affairs select committee wants a focus on treatment and an end to the policy of putting politics above evidence, writes Julian Huppert.

5. The fiscal cliff could split the Republicans (Financial Times)

If Obama persuades enough of the GOP to vote for a tax rise, the party may face civil war, says Edward Luce.

6. Ignore the doom merchants, Britain should get fracking (Daily Telegraph)

Shale gas is green, cheap and plentiful, says Boris Johnson. So why are opponents making such a fuss?

7. Those who would cancel a promise to black America (Guardian)

Racial inequality has deepened, yet Republicans want to ban affirmative action in college admissions, writes Gary Younge.

8. Politics have burst the Monti bubble (Financial Times)

Two things need fixing in Italy, both of which are beyond the scope of the technocrats, writes Wolfgang Munchau.

9. We are wallowing in Labour’s debt, so why is Ed blocking cuts? (Sun)

The Labour leader knows he is walking into a Tory trap and has decided it is worth the risk, writes Trevor Kavanagh.

10. Marriage matters, and it should be rewarded (Daily Telegraph)

Time is running out if David Cameron is to honour his pledge in the Coalition Agreement, writes Tim Loughton.

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Listen: Schools Minister Nick Gibb gets SATs question for 11-year-olds wrong

Exams put too much pressure on children. And on the politicians who insist they don't put too much pressure on children.

As we know from today's news of a primary school exams boycott, or "kids' strike", it's tough being a schoolchild in Britain today. But apparently it's also tough being a Schools Minister.

Nick Gibb, Minister of State at the Department for Education, failed a SATs grammar question for 11-year-olds on the BBC's World at One today. Having spent all morning defending the primary school exams system - criticised by tens of thousands of parents for putting too much pressure on young children - he fell victim to the very test that has come under fire.

Listen here:

Martha Kearney: Let me give you this sentence, “I went to the cinema after I’d eaten my dinner”. Is the word "after" there being used as a subordinating conjunction or as a preposition?

Nick Gibb: Well, it’s a proposition. “After” - it's...

MK: [Laughing]: I don’t think it is...

NG: “After” is a preposition, it can be used in some contexts as a, as a, word that coordinates a subclause, but this isn’t about me, Martha...

MK: No, I think, in this sentence it’s being used a subordinating conjunction!

NG: Fine. This isn’t about me. This is about ensuring that future generations of children, unlike me, incidentally, who was not taught grammar at primary school...

MK: Perhaps not!

NG: ...we need to make sure that future generations are taught grammar properly.

I'm a mole, innit.