Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers

1. The fracking dream which is putting Britain's future at risk (Observer)
George Osborne believes shale gas to be a bonaza of cheap energy. Where's the evidence? asks Andrew Rawnsley

2. How will the economy do? It's anybody's guess (Independent on Sunday)
Forecasters are always wrong, writes John Rentoul

3. George vs Ed: knock yourself out boys (Sunday Times)
The true political contest is between Balls and Osborne, writes Martin Ivens

4. The royal prank shows we're quick to judge, but slow to learn (Observer)
The tragic death of Jacintha Saldanha has highlighted a lack of compassion at too many levels, writes Yvonne Roberts

5. Nurse Russell knows what's killing the NHS (Sunday Times)
At last, the NHS has accepted that compassion is lacking from its wards, writes Jenni Russell

6. The NHS was forged from care, not box-ticking (Independent on Sunday)
The answer is not more targets or managers, says Paul Vallely

7. Fairness is at the heart of Osborne's radical strategy (Sunday Telegraph)
Voters may hate "scroungers", but they would recoil from cuts to benefits for those in work, says Matthew d'Ancona

8. Dave unveils his secret weapon: the welfare wedge (Mail on Sunday)
The Conservatives are starting to look towards the next election, says James Forsyth

9. End the drift in our relationship with Europe (Sunday Telegraph)
David Cameron needs to take charge, says the leader

10. This isn't the time to yield on drug laws (Mail on Sunday)
An impartial inquiry into drug law would be welcome, says the paper's leader


Morning Call
Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.