Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne is Scrooge, but Balls still hasn’t picked his part (Daily Telegraph)

Labour can’t be sure of victory in 2015 until it makes a convincing case for shoestring policies, says Mary Riddell.

2. Blacklisting is the scandal that now demands action (Guardian)

Thousands have been driven out of work in Britain by corporate spying outfits, writes Seumas Milne. It's an outrage that calls for more than an inquiry.

3. Osborne's Autumn Statement will mean a winter of discontent for the disabled (Independent)

The people after whom Osborne is going have no cunning tax lawyers to defend them, writes Matthew Norman.

4. A verdict on our judges: too white, too male (Times) (£)

The judiciary would be more trusted and of higher quality if many more women and black people were appointed, says Jack Straw.

5. Pity this royal baby, its future a public obstacle course (Guardian)

The idea of a 'royal family' has been a big mistake, argues Simon Jenkins. Its members are forced to live under the glare of a terrible spotlight.

6. Beware membership of this elite club (Financial Times)

The business climate among the Brics countries is less than ideal, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

7. Compassion in nursing starts elsewhere (Independent)

If we want kind nurses, we need to work much, much harder to make kinder children, and kinder adults, says Christina Patterson.

8. No one likes a city that's too smart (Guardian)

Let's hope Rio rather than Songdo or Masdar is the inspiration for the urbanists gathering in London this week, writes Richard Sennett.

9. The allies who moulded the welfare state (Financial Times)

William Beveridge and Eleanor Roosevelt were the key influences on modern social policy, writes John Kay.

10. The taxman isn’t really after the big beasts (Daily Telegraph)

Small businesses, not the multinationals, will bear the brunt of the Revenue’s blitz, writes Philip Johnston.

 

 

 

 

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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