Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne is Scrooge, but Balls still hasn’t picked his part (Daily Telegraph)

Labour can’t be sure of victory in 2015 until it makes a convincing case for shoestring policies, says Mary Riddell.

2. Blacklisting is the scandal that now demands action (Guardian)

Thousands have been driven out of work in Britain by corporate spying outfits, writes Seumas Milne. It's an outrage that calls for more than an inquiry.

3. Osborne's Autumn Statement will mean a winter of discontent for the disabled (Independent)

The people after whom Osborne is going have no cunning tax lawyers to defend them, writes Matthew Norman.

4. A verdict on our judges: too white, too male (Times) (£)

The judiciary would be more trusted and of higher quality if many more women and black people were appointed, says Jack Straw.

5. Pity this royal baby, its future a public obstacle course (Guardian)

The idea of a 'royal family' has been a big mistake, argues Simon Jenkins. Its members are forced to live under the glare of a terrible spotlight.

6. Beware membership of this elite club (Financial Times)

The business climate among the Brics countries is less than ideal, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

7. Compassion in nursing starts elsewhere (Independent)

If we want kind nurses, we need to work much, much harder to make kinder children, and kinder adults, says Christina Patterson.

8. No one likes a city that's too smart (Guardian)

Let's hope Rio rather than Songdo or Masdar is the inspiration for the urbanists gathering in London this week, writes Richard Sennett.

9. The allies who moulded the welfare state (Financial Times)

William Beveridge and Eleanor Roosevelt were the key influences on modern social policy, writes John Kay.

10. The taxman isn’t really after the big beasts (Daily Telegraph)

Small businesses, not the multinationals, will bear the brunt of the Revenue’s blitz, writes Philip Johnston.





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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.