Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne is Scrooge, but Balls still hasn’t picked his part (Daily Telegraph)

Labour can’t be sure of victory in 2015 until it makes a convincing case for shoestring policies, says Mary Riddell.

2. Blacklisting is the scandal that now demands action (Guardian)

Thousands have been driven out of work in Britain by corporate spying outfits, writes Seumas Milne. It's an outrage that calls for more than an inquiry.

3. Osborne's Autumn Statement will mean a winter of discontent for the disabled (Independent)

The people after whom Osborne is going have no cunning tax lawyers to defend them, writes Matthew Norman.

4. A verdict on our judges: too white, too male (Times) (£)

The judiciary would be more trusted and of higher quality if many more women and black people were appointed, says Jack Straw.

5. Pity this royal baby, its future a public obstacle course (Guardian)

The idea of a 'royal family' has been a big mistake, argues Simon Jenkins. Its members are forced to live under the glare of a terrible spotlight.

6. Beware membership of this elite club (Financial Times)

The business climate among the Brics countries is less than ideal, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

7. Compassion in nursing starts elsewhere (Independent)

If we want kind nurses, we need to work much, much harder to make kinder children, and kinder adults, says Christina Patterson.

8. No one likes a city that's too smart (Guardian)

Let's hope Rio rather than Songdo or Masdar is the inspiration for the urbanists gathering in London this week, writes Richard Sennett.

9. The allies who moulded the welfare state (Financial Times)

William Beveridge and Eleanor Roosevelt were the key influences on modern social policy, writes John Kay.

10. The taxman isn’t really after the big beasts (Daily Telegraph)

Small businesses, not the multinationals, will bear the brunt of the Revenue’s blitz, writes Philip Johnston.

 

 

 

 

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.