Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The perilous drift to intervention in Syria (Financial Times)

The most telling argument against action remains that the consequences are incalculable, writes Gideon Rachman.

2. Perhaps Osborne is a fine political tactician. But is his economic medicine working? (Independent)

The Chancellor is often the main victim of his wily initiatives, writes Steve Richards.

3. Making hard calls on major issues – the Tory strategy for re-election (Daily Telegraph)

This week’s Autumn Statement should mark a return to realistic, solid government, says Benedict Brogan.

4. Morsi has left Egypt on the brink (Financial Times)

The country is divided between Islamists and the rest and risks civil war, writes Mohamed ElBaradei.

5. Israel must take heed of its friends (Daily Telegraph)

William Hague was right to differ from Israel’s government over the expansion of settlements, says a Telegraph leader.

6. Tories at half-time: cruel and inept, with worse to come (Guardian)

The autumn statement falls on an inauspicious day – Cameron's halfway mark – and is likely to unleash yet more chaos, says Polly Toynbee.

7. We’ll only win this war if banks lend (Daily Mail)

The banks are failing to help Britain recover from the disaster they created, says a Daily Mail editorial.

8. In the battle of the budget, who’s fair wins (Times) (£)

The Chancellor’s challenge is as much about values as maths, says Rachel Sylvester. He can’t afford to misjudge again how voters feel.

9. This is Europe's big chance to help the two-state solution become reality (Guardian)

The EU and its consumers can put pressure on Israel to end expansion of its illegal settlements, say Mary Robinson and Martti Ahtisaari.

10. There’s more trust in business giants than the MPs who call them immoral (Independent)

We should be wary of legislators when they talk morality, writes Dominic Lawson.

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As crime moves online, the police need the investment in technology to follow

Technology offers solutions, not just threats.

It’s perhaps inevitable that as the world becomes more digital, so does crime. This week Alison Saunders, director of public prosecutions, recognised that online crime is as serious as face-to-face crime. “Hate is hate,” Saunders wrote referring to internet abuse, and the police should protect people from it wherever they are. This will add demand to under-pressure police forces. And it is only the tip of the iceberg. 

Forty-seven per cent of crime involves an online element. Police recorded 30,000 instances of online stalking and harassment last year. People are 20 times more likely to be a victim of fraud than robbery, costing businesses an estimated £144bn a year. On a conservative estimate, 2,500 UK citizens use the anonymous dark web browser, Tor, for illegal purposes such as drug dealing, revenge porn and child sexual exploitation.

The police need new technology to meet demand, a Reform report published today finds. Some progress has been made in recent years. West Midlands Police uses an online portal for people to report incidents. Durham uses evidence-gathering software to collect social media information on suspects, and then instantly compile a report that can be shared with courts. Police have benefited from smartphones to share information, and body-worn cameras, which have reduced complaints against police by 93 per cent.

Yet, Theresa May’s 2016 remarks that police use “technology that lags woefully behind what they use as consumers” still stand. Officers interviewed for Reform’s research implored: “Give us the tools to do our job”.

Online evidence portals should be upgraded to accept CCTV footage. Apps should be developed to allow officers to learn about new digital threats, following the US army’s library of knowledge-sharing apps. Augmented-reality glasses are being used in the Netherlands to help officers identify evidence at digital crime scenes. Officers would save a trip back to the station if they could collect fingerprints on smartphones and statements on body-worn cameras.

New technology requires investment, but forces are reducing the resources put into IT as reserves have dried up. Durham plans to cut spend by 60 per cent between 2015-16 and 2019-20. The government should help fund equipment which can meet demand and return future productivity savings. If the Home Office invested the same as the Department of Health, another department pushing “transformative” technology, it would invest an extra £450m a year. This funding should come from administrative savings delivered through accelerating the Government’s automation agenda, which the think tank Reform has previously calculated would save Whitehall £2.6bn a year.

As crime moves online, police must follow. Saunders is right to point to the importance of meeting it. But technology offers solutions, not just threats. Installing the next generation of equipment will give police the tools to do their jobs, addressing online hate and more. 

Alexander Hitchcock is a senior researcher at reform