Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron does not deserve this B-team (Daily Telegraph)

The Tory leader David Cameron can do nothing to satisfy his selfish MPs, says Peter Oborne. The only winner is Ed Miliband.

2. Is plebgate a product of the push for police reform? (Guardian)

The Mitchell affair is a reminder that relations between this government and the force are as bad as any in living memory, writes Martin Kettle.

3. Damned and cast out prematurely. No wonder Mitchell is angry (Independent)

Sometimes in these storms spin doctors can make mistakes, says Steve Richards. Mitchell's apology, in staged public circumstances, seemed an implicit acceptance of guilt.

4. I am not a leftie bank-basher, but why has no one been jailed for their criminality? (Daily Mail)

Without the awareness of fault that a proper inquiry would bring, bankers will repeat their sins, says Stephen Glover.

5. Cameron is wrong to take on the Tory party (Financial Times)

The prime minister’s tactics appear disastrous, says Tessa Keswick.

6. A referendum on Europe? Bring it on, for all our sakes (Guardian)

Cameron, Clegg and Miliband all fear a public vote - but they should go for it nonetheless, says Timothy Garton Ash. Let the people decide.

7. Who Dares Wins (Times) (£)

Obama needs to insist on gun control, not just ask for it, says a Times editorial.

8. Confusion reigns when the police won’t talk (Daily Telegraph)

For the Metropolitan Police, press briefings are a thing of the past – and it’s the public that is losing out, says John Yates.

9. Europe must be sold on shale’s merits (Financial Times)

If the argument is not won, the region could miss out on a huge opportunity, writes Noe van Hulst.

10. The Church is being reborn in cafes and homes (Independent)

New congregations are being created for the benefit of people who’ve never been to Church, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.