Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A sinister new twist in the Mitchell saga (Daily Telegraph)

It beggars belief that an officer has been arrested on suspicion of leaking details of the Mitchell incident to the press, says a Telegraph editorial.

2. Bloomberg shows the way on gun control (Financial Times)

Even after Newtown, it is unrealistic to expect comprehensive legislation, writes Jacob Weisberg.

3. 100% arts funding cut? This Newcastle budget is an act of vandalism (Guardian)

The Labour council's move is a political game intended to shame the coalition – and will wipe out the regional capital's culture, says Lee Hall.

4. No magic solution to human rights quandary (Daily Telegraph)

The law-makers, not the likes of Abu Qatada, are the greatest threat to our liberties, says Mary Riddell.

5. Bernanke – the rebel with a cause (Financial Times)

The Fed chairman’s move to target lower unemployment is genuinely radical, says Sebastian Mallaby.

6. Time for a full review of the needs of the elderly (Independent)

Responses to demographic change have been piecemeal and badly co-ordinated, says an Independent leader.

7. Britain shames itself by detaining immigrants indefinitely (Guardian)

The most incredible element of the UK's policy of indefinite detention is how routine it is, says Ellie Mae O'Hagan. What a sad reflection of our country.

8. The toughest question for Cameron come 2015: how to solve a problem like Ukip? (Independent)

The Prime Minister can no longer ignore Nigel Farage and his party, writes Matthew Norman.

9. Italy doesn’t need this clown – or Berlusconi (Times) (£)

The threatened return of the bunga-bunga warrior is only one part of the country’s refusal to face harsh reality, says Bill Emmott.

 

10. Why Europe will bounce back in 2013 (Financial Times)

Europe’s woes have echoes of an east Asian crisis, says Ruchir Sharma.

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What Jeremy Corbyn gets right about the single market

Technically, you can be outside the EU but inside the single market. Philosophically, you're still in the EU. 

I’ve been trying to work out what bothers me about the response to Jeremy Corbyn’s interview on the Andrew Marr programme.

What bothers me about Corbyn’s interview is obvious: the use of the phrase “wholesale importation” to describe people coming from Eastern Europe to the United Kingdom makes them sound like boxes of sugar rather than people. Adding to that, by suggesting that this “importation” had “destroy[ed] conditions”, rather than laying the blame on Britain’s under-enforced and under-regulated labour market, his words were more appropriate to a politician who believes that immigrants are objects to be scapegoated, not people to be served. (Though perhaps that is appropriate for the leader of the Labour Party if recent history is any guide.)

But I’m bothered, too, by the reaction to another part of his interview, in which the Labour leader said that Britain must leave the single market as it leaves the European Union. The response to this, which is technically correct, has been to attack Corbyn as Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland are members of the single market but not the European Union.

In my view, leaving the single market will make Britain poorer in the short and long term, will immediately render much of Labour’s 2017 manifesto moot and will, in the long run, be a far bigger victory for right-wing politics than any mere election. Corbyn’s view, that the benefits of freeing a British government from the rules of the single market will outweigh the costs, doesn’t seem very likely to me. So why do I feel so uneasy about the claim that you can be a member of the single market and not the European Union?

I think it’s because the difficult truth is that these countries are, de facto, in the European Union in any meaningful sense. By any estimation, the three pillars of Britain’s “Out” vote were, firstly, control over Britain’s borders, aka the end of the free movement of people, secondly, more money for the public realm aka £350m a week for the NHS, and thirdly control over Britain’s own laws. It’s hard to see how, if the United Kingdom continues to be subject to the free movement of people, continues to pay large sums towards the European Union, and continues to have its laws set elsewhere, we have “honoured the referendum result”.

None of which changes my view that leaving the single market would be a catastrophe for the United Kingdom. But retaining Britain’s single market membership starts with making the argument for single market membership, not hiding behind rhetorical tricks about whether or not single market membership was on the ballot last June, when it quite clearly was. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.