Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A sinister new twist in the Mitchell saga (Daily Telegraph)

It beggars belief that an officer has been arrested on suspicion of leaking details of the Mitchell incident to the press, says a Telegraph editorial.

2. Bloomberg shows the way on gun control (Financial Times)

Even after Newtown, it is unrealistic to expect comprehensive legislation, writes Jacob Weisberg.

3. 100% arts funding cut? This Newcastle budget is an act of vandalism (Guardian)

The Labour council's move is a political game intended to shame the coalition – and will wipe out the regional capital's culture, says Lee Hall.

4. No magic solution to human rights quandary (Daily Telegraph)

The law-makers, not the likes of Abu Qatada, are the greatest threat to our liberties, says Mary Riddell.

5. Bernanke – the rebel with a cause (Financial Times)

The Fed chairman’s move to target lower unemployment is genuinely radical, says Sebastian Mallaby.

6. Time for a full review of the needs of the elderly (Independent)

Responses to demographic change have been piecemeal and badly co-ordinated, says an Independent leader.

7. Britain shames itself by detaining immigrants indefinitely (Guardian)

The most incredible element of the UK's policy of indefinite detention is how routine it is, says Ellie Mae O'Hagan. What a sad reflection of our country.

8. The toughest question for Cameron come 2015: how to solve a problem like Ukip? (Independent)

The Prime Minister can no longer ignore Nigel Farage and his party, writes Matthew Norman.

9. Italy doesn’t need this clown – or Berlusconi (Times) (£)

The threatened return of the bunga-bunga warrior is only one part of the country’s refusal to face harsh reality, says Bill Emmott.

 

10. Why Europe will bounce back in 2013 (Financial Times)

Europe’s woes have echoes of an east Asian crisis, says Ruchir Sharma.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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