Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Could Cameron be a bit frit about facing Miliband in TV debates? (Observer)

David Cameron's cold feet about televised leaders' debates suggest a new respect for his Labour opposite number, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

2. America: Too many guns, too little will to change (Independent on Sunday)

Newtown, Connecticut, joins a rollcall of towns whose names become synonymous with violent death, writes Rupert Cornwell. The President has a fight on his hands.

3. American fantasies that lead to massacre (Sunday Times) (£)

The ideal of guns as self-protection owes little to evidence and much to cultural fears, writes David Frum.

4. Where does Danny Boyle’s Britain go from here? (Sunday Telegraph)

We inhabit a pluralistic society – and identifying the common ground is the most pressing challenge for the 21st-century politician, says Matthew d'Ancona.

5. The coalition's in good cheer - so the hangover will be terrible (Mail on Sunday)

The subject on which Cameron and Clegg most disagree - Europe - cannot be avoided much longer, says James Forsyth.

6. Secular Britain is ruled by religious bureaucrats (Observer)

Why is the church still such a force in our society when most of us disregard its clerics' teachings, asks Nick Cohen.

7. Is Scotland in Europe? The SNP doesn’t even know (Sunday Telegraph)

The Scottish Nationalist Party is offering us a one-way ticket to a deeply uncertain future, says Alistair Darling.

8. Clegg has a mind-altering plan for power (Independent on Sunday)

The Liberal Democrat leader has to look for what he might call niche demographics – on an industrial scale, writes John Rentoul.

9. What a week that was for idiotic politics (Sunday Telegraph)

The commitment to gay marriage is seen as some sort of analogue with the Blairite renunciation of Labour’s Clause Four, writes Janet Daley.

10. Never has London seemed more like a city state apart (Observer)

The census suggests a huge gap between the lives and concerns of Londoners and their fellow Britons, says Catherine Bennett.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.