Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Raise a glass to gay marriage – all our lives are better for it (Guardian)

The journey from section 28 to same-sex weddings has been truly radical and rapid – it can be a model for progressive change, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. How Blair conned the Tory party into selling its soul (Daily Mail)

The Conservatives have ended up looking and sounding like a poor imitation of New Labour, says Simon Heffer.

3. Monetary Mandate (Times) (£)

The Bank of England’s remit of price stability is too narrow, argues a Times leader. It should target growth as well as inflation.

4. MPs: get back to the day job (Guardian)

Our politicians should spend less time in select committees, and more in the chamber of the house, argues Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

5. Cameron shouldn’t fear the EU wolf (Financial Times)

Tory detractors fail to take account of their leader’s radicalism, says Michael Portillo.

6. Gay marriage is not a conservative choice (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron’s proposals for gay marriage show that he hasn’t thought very hard about it, says Charles Moore.

7. The real James Bond needs policing (Independent)

The security services have been used in ways that contradict all that Britain holds dear, says an Independent editorial.

8. We'll hunt down the tax avoiders (Guardian)

There should be no hiding place for the proceeds of crime, corruption and tax dodging, writes Vince Cable.

9. State of the unions – getting weaker (Financial Times)

Michigan’s right-to-work law marks a shift in the political landscape, writes Christopher Caldwell.

10. The seeds of another GM row are sown (Daily Telegraph)

Owen Paterson's outburst at opponents of genetically modified crops and foods seems set to revive a decade-old war, writes Geoffrey Lean.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.