Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Raise a glass to gay marriage – all our lives are better for it (Guardian)

The journey from section 28 to same-sex weddings has been truly radical and rapid – it can be a model for progressive change, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. How Blair conned the Tory party into selling its soul (Daily Mail)

The Conservatives have ended up looking and sounding like a poor imitation of New Labour, says Simon Heffer.

3. Monetary Mandate (Times) (£)

The Bank of England’s remit of price stability is too narrow, argues a Times leader. It should target growth as well as inflation.

4. MPs: get back to the day job (Guardian)

Our politicians should spend less time in select committees, and more in the chamber of the house, argues Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

5. Cameron shouldn’t fear the EU wolf (Financial Times)

Tory detractors fail to take account of their leader’s radicalism, says Michael Portillo.

6. Gay marriage is not a conservative choice (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron’s proposals for gay marriage show that he hasn’t thought very hard about it, says Charles Moore.

7. The real James Bond needs policing (Independent)

The security services have been used in ways that contradict all that Britain holds dear, says an Independent editorial.

8. We'll hunt down the tax avoiders (Guardian)

There should be no hiding place for the proceeds of crime, corruption and tax dodging, writes Vince Cable.

9. State of the unions – getting weaker (Financial Times)

Michigan’s right-to-work law marks a shift in the political landscape, writes Christopher Caldwell.

10. The seeds of another GM row are sown (Daily Telegraph)

Owen Paterson's outburst at opponents of genetically modified crops and foods seems set to revive a decade-old war, writes Geoffrey Lean.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.