Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Raise a glass to gay marriage – all our lives are better for it (Guardian)

The journey from section 28 to same-sex weddings has been truly radical and rapid – it can be a model for progressive change, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. How Blair conned the Tory party into selling its soul (Daily Mail)

The Conservatives have ended up looking and sounding like a poor imitation of New Labour, says Simon Heffer.

3. Monetary Mandate (Times) (£)

The Bank of England’s remit of price stability is too narrow, argues a Times leader. It should target growth as well as inflation.

4. MPs: get back to the day job (Guardian)

Our politicians should spend less time in select committees, and more in the chamber of the house, argues Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

5. Cameron shouldn’t fear the EU wolf (Financial Times)

Tory detractors fail to take account of their leader’s radicalism, says Michael Portillo.

6. Gay marriage is not a conservative choice (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron’s proposals for gay marriage show that he hasn’t thought very hard about it, says Charles Moore.

7. The real James Bond needs policing (Independent)

The security services have been used in ways that contradict all that Britain holds dear, says an Independent editorial.

8. We'll hunt down the tax avoiders (Guardian)

There should be no hiding place for the proceeds of crime, corruption and tax dodging, writes Vince Cable.

9. State of the unions – getting weaker (Financial Times)

Michigan’s right-to-work law marks a shift in the political landscape, writes Christopher Caldwell.

10. The seeds of another GM row are sown (Daily Telegraph)

Owen Paterson's outburst at opponents of genetically modified crops and foods seems set to revive a decade-old war, writes Geoffrey Lean.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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