Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour's line in the sand on benefits (Guardian)

Ed Miliband knows that this is not the politics or economics of one nation, writes Ruth Lister.

2. The cowardice at the heart of our relationship with Israel (Daily Telegraph)

The Tories’ shameful reluctance to criticise Tel Aviv is putting any hope of peace at risk, says Peter Oborne.

3. Osborne should heed Carney’s message (Financial Times)

The new BoE governor will bring change, but not all of it welcome, says Chris Giles.

4. Toleration is the thread binding our tapestry (Times) (£)

Gay marriage, women bishops, immigration – the country is changing, says David Aaronovitch. But that won’t harm our proudest tradition.

5. The church has blown it. England's ticked that box (Guardian)

If it still nurses the dream of being the keeper of the nation's conscience, it's going to have to become more like the nation, writes Zoe Williams.

6. Philippines pays price for climate inaction (Financial Times)

In human casualty terms, typhoon Bopha is almost five times worse than hurricane Sandy, writes David Pilling.

7. Aides' threats show why MPs must not be allowed to muzzle the press (Sun)

The mouthpieces representing Mrs Miller and David Cameron have blown the myth that politicians are innocent victims of a feral press, says Trevor Kavanagh.

8. Finucane lays bare the amoral face of Britain (Independent)

Here were army, police and MI5 officers coolly deciding who should live and die, says an Independent leader.

9. There's more to diversity than statistics. We need change at the top (Guardian)

The census captures Britain's diversity, writes Suzanne Moore. Now how about changing a few key institutions to reflect the country's makeup?

10. Sir Jeremy’s Civil Service just isn’t working (Daily Telegraph)

The messy decision to split the top job has caused chaos among Whitehall’s mandarins, writes Sue Cameron.

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Inside the Momentum rally: meet the Jeremy Corbyn supporters challenging Labour’s rebel MPs

The Labour leader's followers had been waiting a long time for him to come along. 

Ed Miliband’s leadership of the Labour Party is at stake. As the news filters through the party’s branches, hundreds of thousands sign petitions in his support. But this is no online craze. By evening, thousands of diehard fans have gathered in Parliament Square, where they shout “Ed, Ed, Ed,” to the beat of a drum. Many swear Ed was the only thing keeping them in the Labour Party. They can’t imagine supporting it without him.

Am I stretching your credibility? Even a Milifan would be hard pressed to imagine such a scene. But this is precisely Labour’s problem. Only Jeremy Corbyn can command this kind of passion.

As the Shadow Cabinet MPs began to resign on Sunday, Momentum activists sprang into action. The rally outside Parliament on Monday evening  was organised with only 24 hours notice. The organisers said 4,000 were there. It certainly felt to me like a thousand or more were crammed into the square, and it took a long time to push through to the front of the crowd. 

In contrast to the whispered corridor conversations happening across the road, the Corbyn fans were noisy. Not only did they chant Jeremy’s name, they booed any mention of the Parliamentary Labour Party and waved signs denouncing rebel MPs as “scabs”. Other posters had a whiff of the cult about them. One declared: “We love Jeremy Corbyn”. Many had the t-shirt. 

“Jeremy Corbyn brought me back into the Labour Party,” Mike Jackson, one of the t-shirt wearers, told me. He had voted Remain, but he didn’t care that the majority of the Shadow Cabinet had resigned. “He’s got a new Shadow Cabinet. It’s more diverse, there are working class voices at last, there are women, the BME community. It is exactly how it should be.” Another man simply told me: “I am here for Corbyn.”

The crowd was diverse, but in the way a university campus is diverse, not a London street or school playground. They shouted angry slogans, then moved aside obligingly for me to pass through. Jack, a young actor who did not want to give his full name, told me: “I used to vote Green. I am joining Labour because of Jeremy Corbyn. I like the guy. He listens. I have seen friends frustrated with him, but I really think he can do it.”

Syada Fatima Dastagir, a student, has supported Labour for years - “Old Labour”. She thought Corbyn would survive the coup: “I voted Green and Plaid Cymru, because I didn’t think Labour supported its roots. This has brought Labour back to its roots.”

This belief that Jezza will overcome was present everywhere in the crowd. When I asked Momentum organiser Sophie Nazemi if she thought Corbyn would go, she replied: “He won’t.”

She continued: “It is important that we demonstrate that if there is a leadership election, Jeremy will win again. It will be three months of distraction we don’t need when there is likely to be an election this year.”

Instead of turning on Corbyn, Labour should be focused on campaigning for better local housing stock and investment in post-industrial towns, she said. 

Whatever happens, she said Momentum would continue to build its grassroots organisation: “This is more than just about Jeremy, whilst Jeremy is our leader.”

As I moved off through the chanting crowds, I remembered bumping into Corbyn at an anti-austerity march just a year ago. Although he had thrown his hat into the ring for Labour leadership, he was on his own, anonymous to most of the passers by. In the year that has passed, he has become the figurehead of an unlikely cult.

Nevertheless, it was also clear from the people I spoke to that they have been waiting ages for him to come along. In other words, they chose their messiah. The PLP may try to bury him. But if these activists have their way, he’ll rise again.