Morning Call: the pick of the papers

Ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

Cameron is right about Leveson. This is a Rubicon we must not cross (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins argues against statutory underpinning for press regulation.

 

Carney will gain by exploring the territory (Financial Times)

 

Adam Posen writes that the new Bank of England governor will have to prioritise open debate and public engagement.

 

Nick Boles wants to build on the greenbelt, but it's too soon for us to admire man-made landscapes (Independent)

 

Tom Sutcliffe explores the aesthetics of nature and human development.

 

With Ukip's surge, do we still have a progressive majority? (Guardian

 

John Harris argues that Ukip's strong by-election results indicate widespread distrust of politicians.

 

Mick and Sonny are still rockin' on, but will Madonna and Robbie last as long? (Independent

 

David Lister asks why age expectations are different for musicians in rock, jazz and blues.

 

So what happened to your defence of liberty, Harriet Harman? (Telegraph

 

Dan Hodges argues that Labour's support for Leveson is driven by a desire for political revenge.

 

Keep the kids in Beer St, not Vodka Plaza (Times) (£) 

 

Janice Turner argues that education, not raising alcohol prices, will cut down on binge-drinking.

 

The Chancellor George Osborne's alarming device is just the weapon for a country at war (Telegraph

 

Charles Moore says that Quantitive Easing has prevented the crisis from becoming even deeper.

 

Here's what to do in the Middle East: nothing (Times) (£) 

 

Matthew Parris says Britain should intervene less in overseas conflicts.

 

Morsi has squandered Egypt's goodwill (Financial Times

 

Roula Khalaf and Heba Saleh explain that Egypt's president is no longer a unifying figure.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.