Morning Call:pick of the papers

Ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Israel and Palestine's leaders - and cheerleaders - have failed them again (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland gives eloquent voice to the despair of those who prefer not treat Middle East conflict as a platform to rehearse old tribal positions. 

2. The press should hug the Leveson report in a grim embrace of welcome (Telegraph)

Newspapers are reacting to the idea of regulation like bolshie shop stewards in the early 80s, writes Charles Moore.

3. Church and state must loosen their bonds (Times)

Matthew Parris sees 'limited and piecemeal' disestablishment as the only plausible way forward for the Church of England.

4. Everyone's a winner in Brussels (Independent)

Leading article sees the bright side of an EU summit failure to get a budget deal.

5. Bright idea that may end up costing more (FT)

'Undercover Economist' Tim Harford unpicks the government's energy tariff reform plans.

6. Why Cameron will regret his 'fruitcakes and loonies' insult (Daily Mail)

Simon Heffer sees Ukip as a sanctuary for authentic Tories chased away from their party by David Cameron.

7. Morsi's mistake (FT)

Leading article urges Egypt's president to reverse power-grabbing, anti-democratic decree.

8. The 'nutrition gap' between Britain's rich and poor is vast - and wicked (Guardian)

The reasons are complex, but it is still a disgrace that healthy eating is the preserve of the well-off, writes Ian Jack

9. The BBC can get out of this hole (Telegraph)

Former Director General Greg Dyke gives his tuppence worth on the problems with BBC governance.

10. End the loneliness of the long-running life (Times)

Other countries are well ahead of the UK in understanding the civilised way to grow old, writes Janice Turner.

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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