Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Michael Heseltine's on the right road – so who's going to take it? (Guardian)

The Treasury must hate the maverick former minister's report, but it should realise his ideas have deep Tory roots, says Martin Kettle.

2. The coalition can’t keep facing two ways at once on public spending (Daily Telegraph)

Agreement on reducing debt between the Conservatives and Lib Dems is vital if the government is to make it through to 2015, says Peter Oborne.

3. America Decides (Times) (£)

President Obama has lost the campaign and his record has many holes, says a Times editorial. But he has done enough to earn a second term.

4. The Commons has spoken for the nation on the EU (Daily Telegraph)

The time has come for Britain to take a stand against the profligacy of the European Commission - real-terms spending must be cut, says a Telegraph leader.

5. New York’s ascent meets the rising ocean (Financial Times)

The city is not the only global economic hub at the mercy of climate change and rising tides, writes John Gapper.

6. Britain must atone for its sins in Palestine (Daily Telegraph)

Ever since the Balfour Declaration of 1917, Britain has denied our people their rights, says Nabeel Shaath.

7. Who profits from being in care? It's not the children (Guardian)

Dumped in areas cheap enough for contractors to make a decent return, it's little wonder 'cared-for' children fail to thrive, writes Zoe Williams.

8. The tragedy of Britain is the lack of a governing class brave enough to make big decisions (Daily Mail)

Democracy shouldn’t mean buckling into noisy minorities selfishly defending their corner, writes Stephen Glover.

9. How to improve life for the 'squeezed middle' (Independent)

The onus is on the politicians to act – or explain why they will not, says an Independent leader.

10. Banking may lose its allure for the best and brightest (Financial Times)

The really stark relative shrinkage of finance might lie ahead, writes Gillian Tett.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.