Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. America on the edge of a 'fiscal cliff'? No, it's the right peddling scare stories (Guardian)

The economic abyss is a distortion peddled by the US right and Obama's Democrats – just like Britain's left – need to counter the myth, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

2. The BBC can be brilliant - despite its shambolic army of suits and bean-counters (Daily Mail)

The corporation worked much better when it was much smaller, as it should now become again, writes Max Hastings.

3. Obama proves you can win in tough times (Times) (£)

On both sides of the Atlantic, voters want economic toughness and social liberalism, says George Osborne.

4. Police commissioner elections: hardly The Wire, but they still really matter (Guardian)

Not voting for a police and crime commissioner on Thursday means turning your back on the frightened and vulnerable, says Gaby Hinsliff.

5. The downfall of David Petraeus may be a blessing in disguise (Independent)

Obama now has more freedom to exert his will in the military sphere, writes Mary Dejevsky.

6. Let the public run our national broadcaster (Daily Telegraph)

The BBC can weather this storm if we eradicate its culture of moral smugness, says Tessa Jowell.

7. China and US navigate in risky waters (Financial Times)

The narrowing of the power gap between the two countries is already raising tensions, writes Gideon Rachman.

8. Osborne needs to show a little love to the squeezed middle (Daily Telegraph)

Reforming the 40p tax rate would reward those who have borne the brunt of austerity, writes Benedict Brogan.

9. Only when the BBC decides what it is for will it be able to regain trust (Independent)

The failures of Newsnight have nothing to do with budget cuts, writes Dominic Lawson. Even the least well-funded local newspaper would have done better than this.

10. Investigative journalism must live on despite the Newsnight crisis (Guardian)

The world would be a worse place without investigative journalism, but lack of funding is a real danger for this craft, writes David Leigh.

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.