Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. America has supersized inequality. Political gridlock was bound to follow (Guardian)

US voters are split along an ever-widening faultline of wealth and poverty, so it's no wonder there's little hope of moderation in politics, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

2. Support for Obama: the Tories’ guilty secret (Times) (£)

Ministers lean more towards the socially liberal Democrats than the ‘fiscally mad’ and ‘extreme’ Republicans, writes Rachel Sylvester.

3. Clegg’s tit-for-tat retaliation could bring about the coalition’s end (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister will have to hit back if his deputy deliberately kills off the boundary review, says Benedict Brogan.

4. A Romney presidency would be just fine (Financial Times)

The GOP candidate is more likely a moderate than a Tea Party radical, says Gideon Rachman.

5. Obama and Romney remain silent on climate change, the biggest issue of all (Guardian)

Despite hurricane Sandy, neither Obama nor Romney will speak about global warming, writes George Monbiot. The danger this poses is huge.

6. Britain and Germany are growing apart (Financial Times)

Berlin is losing patience with what it views as London’s intransigence on Europe, writes Janan Ganesh.

7. Obama or Romney - neither should expect to get much done in the Congress (Daily Telegraph)

America’s broken and hostile political system will seriously impede the actions of whoever is elected president, says Tim Stanley.

8. We need nothing less than a revolution to make the EU serve democracy and working people again (Independent)

Why isn't the left kicking off about an institution that is clearly damaging the interest of workers across the continent, asks Owen Jones.

9. The living wage tide is turning, but it's not enough (Guardian)

Paying the minimum required for survival is only part of the cure for Britain's dangerous levels of inequality, says Polly Toynbee.

10. Where materialism now rules, ‘Marxist morality’ might not find a place (Independent)

As Americans go to the poll today, China is going through its own transition, but by any impartial assessment, democracy remains a long way off, writes Jonathan Fenby.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.