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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. A Mitt Romney win would merely reward Republicans for bad behaviour (Guardian)

Obama's presidency may have been too timid, but let's not forget who's been responsible for the US's political gridlock, says Gary Younge.

2. Obama is the wiser bet for crisis-hit US (Financial Times)

There remains a need for intelligent, reformist US governance, says an FT editorial. Obama looks the better choice.

3. Vote Mitt: the world needs this deal-maker (Times) (£)

Obama has proved that he can’t reach across party lines, says Tim Montgomerie.

4. If only we had a real choice like America (Daily Mail)

While Obama and Romney offer two entirely different visions of the US's future, our parties have become ever more similar, writes Simon Heffer.

5. The Tories are emasculating the Equality and Human Rights Commission (Independent)

The government is attempting to frame human rights and equality as a fringe concern, but these are issues that should matter to us all, writes Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

6. We’re on our way out of EU but PM must rein in the rebels (Sun)

Britain is surely heading for the EU exit, but it cannot afford to be blamed for bringing the roof down as it goes, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. Labour must not let Britain drift into a European exit (Guardian)

After last week's political opportunism, Ed Miliband has to ensure his party counters the nation's growing anti-EU sentiment, writes Jackie Ashley.

8. The Taliban's main fear is not drones but educated girls (Guardian)

If Pakistan really wants to combat the fundamentalists, it should be protecting its children and their teachers, writes Mohammed Hanif.

9. There is no place for French-style protectionism in UK (Financial Times)

France’s approach to takeovers has not helped its economy, writes Geoff Owen.

10. Listen up, Mitt – because I’ve got the key to the White House (Daily Telegraph)

Planet Earth is rooting for Obama, but his rival can change that with one simple gesture, writes Boris Johnson.