Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why I believe America and the world still need Barack Obama (Observer)

The president's fight for regeneration and equality goes on. He must have four more years, writes Jesse Jackson.

2. David Cameron fears a chill wind blowing across the Atlantic (Sunday Telegraph)

The Tories’ strategy for winning in 2015 is founded on the power of incumbency – but the US election may prove that this is no longer a strong card to hold, says Matthew d'Ancona.

3. The joyous power of bawling out the boss (Independent on Sunday)

Bureaucrats may try to control our working lives, but as Danny Baker dramatically showed, employees can find ways of striking back, Andrew Gimson writes.

4. This latest Tory rebellion was not just cynical, it was completely bogus (Observer)

The result of the unholy alliance between Tory Europhobes and Labour will be to increase the cost of the EU, argues Andrew Rawnsley.

 
Europe may be the big issue but Trident and energy are also testing the partnership, says Iain Martin.
 
 
There are good reasons why fellow members of the EU should regard us with deep suspicion, argues Dominic Lawson.
 
 
Greek democracy is in peril and much of the fault lies with the EU's hard stance, says Nick Cohen.
 
 
The debate on wind farms is a huge and bad-tempered argument between two people saying, in effect, precisely the same thing, argues Rod Liddle.
 
9. Meet Westminster's answer to James Bond (Independent on Sunday)
 
The SNP will ask the Scottish electorate to vote for a greased pig in a dark poke, writes John Rentoul.
 
 
The SNP needs to do more to answer detail so they can earn a right to a debate on principle. But so do the conservatives who wish to stand still, argues Andrew Wilson.
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Donald Trump's healthcare failure could be to his advantage

The appearance of weakness is less electorally damaging than actually removing healthcare from millions of people.

Good morning. Is it all over for Donald Trump? His approval ratings have cratered to below 40%. Now his attempt to dismantle Barack Obama's healthcare reforms have hit serious resistance from within the Republican Party, adding to the failures and retreats of his early days in office.

The problem for the GOP is that their opposition to Obamacare had more to do with the word "Obama" than the word "care". The previous President opted for a right-wing solution to the problem of the uninsured in a doomed attempt to secure bipartisan support for his healthcare reform. The politician with the biggest impact on the structures of the Affordable Care Act is Mitt Romney.

But now that the Republicans control all three branches of government they are left in a situation where they have no alternative to Obamacare that wouldn't either a) shred conservative orthodoxies on healthcare or b) create numerous and angry losers in their constituencies. The difficulties for Trump's proposal is that it does a bit of both.

Now the man who ran on his ability to cut a deal has been forced to make a take it or leave plea to Republicans in the House of Representatives: vote for this plan or say goodbye to any chance of repealing Obamacare.

But that's probably good news for Trump. The appearance of weakness and failure is less electorally damaging than actually succeeding in removing healthcare from millions of people, including people who voted for Trump.

Trump won his first term because his own negatives as a candidate weren't quite enough to drag him down on a night when he underperformed Republican candidates across the country. The historical trends all make it hard for a first-term incumbent to lose. So far, Trump's administration is largely being frustrated by the Republican establishment though he is succeeding in leveraging the Presidency for the benefit of his business empire.

But it may be that in the failure to get anything done he succeeds in once again riding Republican coattails to victory in 2020.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.