Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why I believe America and the world still need Barack Obama (Observer)

The president's fight for regeneration and equality goes on. He must have four more years, writes Jesse Jackson.

2. David Cameron fears a chill wind blowing across the Atlantic (Sunday Telegraph)

The Tories’ strategy for winning in 2015 is founded on the power of incumbency – but the US election may prove that this is no longer a strong card to hold, says Matthew d'Ancona.

3. The joyous power of bawling out the boss (Independent on Sunday)

Bureaucrats may try to control our working lives, but as Danny Baker dramatically showed, employees can find ways of striking back, Andrew Gimson writes.

4. This latest Tory rebellion was not just cynical, it was completely bogus (Observer)

The result of the unholy alliance between Tory Europhobes and Labour will be to increase the cost of the EU, argues Andrew Rawnsley.

 
Europe may be the big issue but Trident and energy are also testing the partnership, says Iain Martin.
 
 
There are good reasons why fellow members of the EU should regard us with deep suspicion, argues Dominic Lawson.
 
 
Greek democracy is in peril and much of the fault lies with the EU's hard stance, says Nick Cohen.
 
 
The debate on wind farms is a huge and bad-tempered argument between two people saying, in effect, precisely the same thing, argues Rod Liddle.
 
9. Meet Westminster's answer to James Bond (Independent on Sunday)
 
The SNP will ask the Scottish electorate to vote for a greased pig in a dark poke, writes John Rentoul.
 
 
The SNP needs to do more to answer detail so they can earn a right to a debate on principle. But so do the conservatives who wish to stand still, argues Andrew Wilson.
Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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