Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why I believe America and the world still need Barack Obama (Observer)

The president's fight for regeneration and equality goes on. He must have four more years, writes Jesse Jackson.

2. David Cameron fears a chill wind blowing across the Atlantic (Sunday Telegraph)

The Tories’ strategy for winning in 2015 is founded on the power of incumbency – but the US election may prove that this is no longer a strong card to hold, says Matthew d'Ancona.

3. The joyous power of bawling out the boss (Independent on Sunday)

Bureaucrats may try to control our working lives, but as Danny Baker dramatically showed, employees can find ways of striking back, Andrew Gimson writes.

4. This latest Tory rebellion was not just cynical, it was completely bogus (Observer)

The result of the unholy alliance between Tory Europhobes and Labour will be to increase the cost of the EU, argues Andrew Rawnsley.

 
Europe may be the big issue but Trident and energy are also testing the partnership, says Iain Martin.
 
 
There are good reasons why fellow members of the EU should regard us with deep suspicion, argues Dominic Lawson.
 
 
Greek democracy is in peril and much of the fault lies with the EU's hard stance, says Nick Cohen.
 
 
The debate on wind farms is a huge and bad-tempered argument between two people saying, in effect, precisely the same thing, argues Rod Liddle.
 
9. Meet Westminster's answer to James Bond (Independent on Sunday)
 
The SNP will ask the Scottish electorate to vote for a greased pig in a dark poke, writes John Rentoul.
 
 
The SNP needs to do more to answer detail so they can earn a right to a debate on principle. But so do the conservatives who wish to stand still, argues Andrew Wilson.
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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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