Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Leveson inquiry is irrelevant to 21st-century journalism (Guardian)

The judge's findings will address the nefarious behaviour of newspapers but not the vast array of media on the internet, writes Emily Bell.

2. Cameron will pay a heavy price for his whips' feebleness (Daily Telegraph)

The PM’s haughty disregard of his own party is reminiscent of Tony Blair at his peak, says Peter Oborne.

3. The law, Fleet Street and a free press (Financial Times)

There are many traps but a decent outcome is possible, writes John Gapper.

4. No time to equivocate on Palestine (Independent)

The UN must approve the Palestinians' bid for recognition as a non-member observer state, says an Independent leader.

5. Work Programme: why I knew the figures would be awful (Guardian)

The idea that the way out of unemployment is via huge contracts for profit-driven enterprises invites them to game the system, says Zoe Williams.

6. You can trust the public. They’re not savages (Times) (£)

People can judge the press for themselves, they can judge TV debates and they can judge how to spend their money, says David Aaronovitch.

7. There is a middle way: a privacy law with a public interest built into it (Independent)

The dichotomy between self-regulation on the one hand and government regulation on the other is false, argues Andreas Whittam Smith.

8. A nanny state that dictates what we drink will soon be telling us how to think (Daily Mail)

People do not elect governments to tell them how to live their lives, or to lecture them about ethical living, writes Simon Heffer.

9. Time for the chancellor to be honest (Financial Times)

The autumn statement must be truthful about the UK’s economic struggle ahead, says Chris Giles.

10. Boles offers a recipe for senseless sprawl (Daily Telegraph)

Unfettered building in the south east would be disastrous, says a Telegraph editorial.

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Jeremy Corbyn fans are getting extremely angry at the wrong Michael Foster

He didn't try to block the Labour leader off a ballot. He's just against hunting with dogs. 

Michael Foster was a Labour MP for Worcester from 1997 to 2010, where he was best known for trying to ban hunting with dogs. After losing his seat to Tory Robin Walker, he settled back into private life.

He quietly worked for a charity, and then a trade association. That is, until his doppelganger tried to get Jeremy Corbyn struck off the ballot paper. 

The Labour donor Michael Foster challenged Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Corbyn automatically run for leadership in court. He lost his bid, and Corbyn supporters celebrated.

And some of the most jubilant decided to tell Foster where to go. 

Foster told The Staggers he had received aggressive tweets: "I have had my photograph in the online edition of The Sun with the story. I had to ring them up and suggest they take it down. It is quite a common name."

Indeed, Michael Foster is such a common name that there were two Labour MPs with that name between 1997 and 2010. The other was Michael Jabez Foster, MP for Hastings and Rye. 

One senior Labour MP rang the Worcester Michael Foster up this week, believing he was the donor. 

Foster explained: "When I said I wasn't him, then he began to talk about the time he spent in Hastings with me which was the other Michael Foster."

Having two Michael Fosters in Parliament at the same time (the donor Michael Foster was never an MP) could sometimes prove useful. 

Foster said: "When I took the bill forward to ban hunting, he used to get quite a few of my death threats.

"Once I paid his pension - it came out of my salary."

Foster has never met the donor Michael Foster. An Owen Smith supporter, he admits "part of me" would have been pleased if he had managed to block Corbyn from the ballot paper, but believes it could have caused problems down the line.

He does however have a warning for Corbyn supporters: "If Jeremy wins, a place like Worcester will never have a Labour MP.

"I say that having years of working in the constituency. And Worcester has to be won by Labour as part of that tranche of seats to enable it to form a government."