Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mohamed Morsi and the fight for Egypt (Guardian)

President Morsi says his power grab is temporary, writes Magdi Abdelhadi. But history shows that such measures have a habit of becoming permanent.

2. Will Cameron slot in the missing piece of Beveridge’s jigsaw? (Daily Telegraph)

At last, the coalition is poised to end the dithering over properly funded social care, writes Mary Riddell.

3. Obama must do more than raise taxes (Financial Times)

The president should be bold and aim for true fiscal stability, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

4. Bullies and the need for a free press (Daily Mail)

Statutory regulation would mean we lose the best characteristics of the press — but keep the worst, says David Davis.

5. The elite's fear of a vote on Europe feeds a populist right (Guardian)

Rotherham's race rows may be a taste of toxicity to come, says Seumas Milne. Labour support for a referendum would help draw the poison.

6. Don’t sack the manager. Think of Ken Clarke (Times) (£)

Political form, like footballing form, doesn’t really exist, writes Daniel Finkelstein. What matters is long-term class.

7. Japan’s nationalism is a sign of weakness (Financial Times)

If the country looks inward, both it and the world will be worse off, writes Joseph Nye.

8. This bid to force all schools into line will end in failure (Guardian)

The craving for uniformity in public services has become a frenzy, but Michael Gove cannot run every classroom, writes Simon Jenkins.

9. Mark Carney: A Canadian we can bank on (Daily Telegraph)

There is much the Chancellor can learn from the Bank of England’s new Governor – if he’ll listen, writes Allister Heath.

10. For all the misery and nuisance they cause, league tables are a necessary part of public service (Independent)

There’s nothing like doing badly in a league table to make bosses want to make things better, writes Christina Patterson.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.