Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mohamed Morsi and the fight for Egypt (Guardian)

President Morsi says his power grab is temporary, writes Magdi Abdelhadi. But history shows that such measures have a habit of becoming permanent.

2. Will Cameron slot in the missing piece of Beveridge’s jigsaw? (Daily Telegraph)

At last, the coalition is poised to end the dithering over properly funded social care, writes Mary Riddell.

3. Obama must do more than raise taxes (Financial Times)

The president should be bold and aim for true fiscal stability, writes Sebastian Mallaby.

4. Bullies and the need for a free press (Daily Mail)

Statutory regulation would mean we lose the best characteristics of the press — but keep the worst, says David Davis.

5. The elite's fear of a vote on Europe feeds a populist right (Guardian)

Rotherham's race rows may be a taste of toxicity to come, says Seumas Milne. Labour support for a referendum would help draw the poison.

6. Don’t sack the manager. Think of Ken Clarke (Times) (£)

Political form, like footballing form, doesn’t really exist, writes Daniel Finkelstein. What matters is long-term class.

7. Japan’s nationalism is a sign of weakness (Financial Times)

If the country looks inward, both it and the world will be worse off, writes Joseph Nye.

8. This bid to force all schools into line will end in failure (Guardian)

The craving for uniformity in public services has become a frenzy, but Michael Gove cannot run every classroom, writes Simon Jenkins.

9. Mark Carney: A Canadian we can bank on (Daily Telegraph)

There is much the Chancellor can learn from the Bank of England’s new Governor – if he’ll listen, writes Allister Heath.

10. For all the misery and nuisance they cause, league tables are a necessary part of public service (Independent)

There’s nothing like doing badly in a league table to make bosses want to make things better, writes Christina Patterson.

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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.