The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. The nasty babble which stigmatises depression (Guardian)

Mental health debate is like a pre-Enlightenment scream in its ignorance, writes Tanya Gold.

2. It is Mitt Romney’s 'gaffes’ that should win him the election (Telegraph)

The Republican best represents his country’s ability to renew itself for each generation, writes Charles Moore.

3. Jimmy Savile was an emperor with no clothes – and a celebrity cloak (Guardian)

Savile's invisible but dazzling cloak of fame stopped everyone from suggesting he was exactly the scary, child-catching creature he seemed to be, writes Deborah Orr.

4. US election: whoever wins on Tuesday, the impact will be profound (Guardian)

It's totally wrong to think there's little difference between Obama and Romney. We should all remember Gore v Bush, writes Jonathan Freedland.

5. The United States: a struggling nation that is polls apart (Telegraph)

America is divided as never before on class, gender, race and economic lines – but voters agree on the big issue, writes Niall Ferguson.

6. A land worth fighting for (Telegraph)

Fifty years on, we still say that adequate housing should not mean concreting over the country, writes the Telegraph.

7. UK rushes needlessly towards the EU exit (Financial Times)

The EU is in an era of transformation, writes Martin Wolf.

8. George Lucas: The director strikes back (Financial Times)

Disney’s purchase of Lucasfilm is the end of an unlikely Hollywood story, writes Nigel Andrews.

9. It took Sandy for the US to debate science (Financial Times)

The superstorm has given climate change the importance it deserves, writes Clive Cookson.

10. Heseltine or Redwood? I say firmly: ‘Yes’ (Times)

 

The important Tory divide is not over Europe, but between believers and disbelievers in the magic of state action, writes Matthew Parris.