Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Welcome, Mr Carney – Britain needs you (Financial Times)

The next BoE governor must chart a voyage back to something close to normality, writes Martin Wolf.

2. On Leveson, David Cameron's dilemma is that the press can still ruin careers (Guardian)

Coverage of the Leveson inquiry proves why the press must be reformed – but it also shows the risk involved in doing so, says Peter Wilby.

3. Don’t force the press into politicians’ arms (Times) (£)

Newspapers have forfeited the right to self-regulation, but state regulation is dangerous, argues Times editor James Harding.

4. Tories should take on Nigel Farage, not woo him (Independent)

Cameron knows that an electoral pact would be mad, impracticable, and philosophically incoherent, writes Steve Richards.

5. Obama should end his reticence on rights (Financial Times)

The US president would surely like his foreign policy legacy to be about more than success in a war on terror, says Gideon Rachman.

6. Europe's €50bn bung that enriches landowners and kills wildlife (Guardian)

The EU's farm subsidies are a modern equivalent of feudal aid, writes George Monbiot. As Europe suffers under austerity, it's right to call for reform.

7. It has taken the left years, but finally the press is at its mercy (Daily Telegraph)

Whatever low opinion the country has of its press, it has even less confidence in politicians as invigilators, says Benedict Brogan.

8. Ukip are not closet racists – but we’ve had enough (Daily Telegraph)

The adoption case in Rotherham has become a wake-up call from Ukip to Westminster, writes Nigel Farage.

9. It would make a mockery of justice if foreign judges start to overrule our own institutions (Daily Mail)

It’s time to face up to the issue and pull out of the European Court’s jurisdiction altogether, argues former justice minister Nick Herbert.

10. Binyamin Netanyahu's fig leaf could be back (Guardian)

Retirement might not stop Ehud Barak playing a key role in any Israeli plans to attack Iran, writes Aluf Benn.

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The Home Office made Theresa May. But it could still destroy her

Even politicians who leave the Home Office a success may find themselves dogged by it. 

Good morning. When Theresa May left the Home Office for the last time, she told civil servants that there would always be a little bit of the Home Office inside her.

She meant in terms of its enduring effect on her, but today is a reminder of its enduring ability to do damage on her reputation in the present day.

The case of Jamal al-Harith, released from Guantanamo Bay under David Blunkett but handed a £1m compensation payout under Theresa May, who last week died in a suicide bomb attack on Iraqi forces in Mosul, where he was fighting on behalf of Isis. 

For all Blunkett left in the wake of a scandal, his handling of the department was seen to be effective and his reputation was enhanced, rather than diminished, by his tenure. May's reputation as a "safe pair of hands" in the country, as "one of us" on immigration as far as the Conservative right is concerned and her credibility as not just another headbanger on stop and search all come from her long tenure at the Home Office. 

The event was the cue for the Mail to engage in its preferred sport of Blair-bashing. It’s all his fault for the payout – which in addition to buying al-Harith a house may also have fattened the pockets of IS – and the release. Not so fast, replied Blair in a punchy statement: didn’t you campaign for him to be released, and wasn’t the payout approved by your old pal Theresa May? (I paraphrase slightly.)

That resulted in a difficult Q&A for Downing Street’s spokesman yesterday, which HuffPo’s Paul Waugh has posted in full here. As it was May’s old department which has the job of keeping tabs on domestic terror threats the row rebounds onto her. 

Blair is right to say that every government has to “balance proper concern for civil liberties with desire to protect our security”. And it would be an act of spectacular revisionism to declare that Blair’s government was overly concerned with civil liberty rather than internal security.

Whether al-Harith should never have been freed or, as his family believe, was picked up by mistake before being radicalised in prison is an open question. Certainly the journey from wrongly-incarcerated fellow traveller to hardened terrorist is one that we’ve seen before in Northern Ireland and may have occurred here.

Regardless, the presumption of innocence is an important one but it means that occasionally, that means that someone goes on to commit crimes again. (The case of Ian Stewart, convicted of murdering the author Helen Bailey yesterday, and who may have murdered his first wife Diane Stewart as well, is another example of this.)

Nonetheless, May won’t have got that right every time. Her tenure at the Home Office, so crucial to her reputation as a “safe pair of hands”, may yet be weaponised by a clever rival, whether from inside or outside the Conservative Party. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.