Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Welcome, Mr Carney – Britain needs you (Financial Times)

The next BoE governor must chart a voyage back to something close to normality, writes Martin Wolf.

2. On Leveson, David Cameron's dilemma is that the press can still ruin careers (Guardian)

Coverage of the Leveson inquiry proves why the press must be reformed – but it also shows the risk involved in doing so, says Peter Wilby.

3. Don’t force the press into politicians’ arms (Times) (£)

Newspapers have forfeited the right to self-regulation, but state regulation is dangerous, argues Times editor James Harding.

4. Tories should take on Nigel Farage, not woo him (Independent)

Cameron knows that an electoral pact would be mad, impracticable, and philosophically incoherent, writes Steve Richards.

5. Obama should end his reticence on rights (Financial Times)

The US president would surely like his foreign policy legacy to be about more than success in a war on terror, says Gideon Rachman.

6. Europe's €50bn bung that enriches landowners and kills wildlife (Guardian)

The EU's farm subsidies are a modern equivalent of feudal aid, writes George Monbiot. As Europe suffers under austerity, it's right to call for reform.

7. It has taken the left years, but finally the press is at its mercy (Daily Telegraph)

Whatever low opinion the country has of its press, it has even less confidence in politicians as invigilators, says Benedict Brogan.

8. Ukip are not closet racists – but we’ve had enough (Daily Telegraph)

The adoption case in Rotherham has become a wake-up call from Ukip to Westminster, writes Nigel Farage.

9. It would make a mockery of justice if foreign judges start to overrule our own institutions (Daily Mail)

It’s time to face up to the issue and pull out of the European Court’s jurisdiction altogether, argues former justice minister Nick Herbert.

10. Binyamin Netanyahu's fig leaf could be back (Guardian)

Retirement might not stop Ehud Barak playing a key role in any Israeli plans to attack Iran, writes Aluf Benn.

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Space Oddity? Dr David Bowie is treating former astronaut Buzz Aldrin

Ground control to major coincidence.

The 86-year-old former astronaut and second man on the moon Buzz Aldrin has been evacuated from the South Pole to hospital in New Zealand. Your mole thought this was yet another piece of dismal 2016 news, before the silver lining popped up on Twitter. Aldrin’s manager Christina Korp sent a thrilling message about her client’s treatment:

Yes, the real-life “Starman” is going to be treated by a doctor who shares his name with the late pop icon who wrote “Space Oddity”, “Life on Mars?”, “Ziggy Stardust” and “Starman”, among many other odes to space.

In fact, Bowie’s “Space Oddity” hit about ground control losing contact with the fictional astronaut Major Tom was released in 1969, a few days before Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to walk on the moon. This mole’s whiskers are quivering at the poignancy.

I'm a mole, innit.