Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain’s bluster serves the eurozone well (Financial Times)

David Cameron is giving the grouping the nudge it needs, writes Wolfgang Munchau

2. When Leveson reports, parliament must act swiftly (Guardian)

MPs of all parties asked for this inquiry. We would be betraying the media's victims if we ignored its findings, writes Ed Miliband

3. A brief glimpse of a better Europe, then back to reality (Guardian)

David Cameron knows the value of working with the EU, but his hands are tied by Tory Europhobes and Ukip, writes Jackie Ashley

4. I see one last, if faint, hope for a truly free British press (Telegraph)

For the Prime Minister to offer the newspapers a final chance would be both statesmanlike and a complete political nightmare, says Matthew d'Ancona

5. Church and State must loosen their bonds (The Times)

It doesn’t need to be divorce. But if Anglicans take their laws from God, they can’t expect us all to follow them, writes Matthew Parris.

6. Horrible singers, horny snowmen and horrendous slave labour (Guardian)

This year's crop of festive high-street commercials feature fey, irritating cover versions and sexist scenarios, writes Charlie Brooker

7. Washington must stop the creeping rust (Financial Times)

The need to invest for the future becomes alarmingly clear, writes Edward Luce

8. Ignorance of paedophilia harms efforts to tackle it (Guardian)

News stories provoke panic but not informed debate. A charity aims to change that, writes Mark Solms

9. I’ve seen the future in India, and Britain can share the spoils (Telegraph)

Indian dynamism puts the eurozone to shame. This is where we need to be doing business, says Boris Johnson

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Britain’s bluster serves the eurozone well

One of the curious things about the EU is a predictable inverse relationship between the amount of money at stake and the time spent on negotiations.

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/ab340340-34c9-11e2-99df-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz2DJNcUcQa

Britain’s bluster serves the eurozone well

One of the curious things about the EU is a predictable inverse relationship between the amount of money at stake and the time spent on negotiations.

Has Lord Leveson noticed the demonisation of minorities? Writes Yasmin Alibhai Brown

 

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Keir Starmer's Brexit diary: Why doesn't David Davis want to answer my questions?

The shadow Brexit secretary on the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, the Prime Minister's speech and tracking down his opposite in government. 

My Brexit diary starts with a week of frustration and anticipation. 

Following the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, I asked that David Davis come to Parliament on the first day back after recess to make a statement. My concern was not so much the fact of Ivan’s resignation, but the basis – his concern that the government still had not agreed negotiating terms and so the UKRep team in Brussels was under-prepared for the challenge ahead. Davis refused to account, and I was deprived of the opportunity to question him. 

However, concerns about the state of affairs described by Rogers did prompt the Prime Minister to promise a speech setting out more detail of her approach to Brexit. Good, we’ve had precious little so far! The speech is now scheduled for Tuesday. Whether she will deliver clarity and reassurance remains to be seen. 

The theme of the week was certainly the single market; the question being what the PM intends to give up on membership, as she hinted in her otherwise uninformative Sophy Ridge interview. If she does so in her speech on Tuesday, she needs to set out in detail what she sees the alternative being, that safeguards jobs and the economy. 

For my part, I’ve had the usual week of busy meetings in and out of Parliament, including an insightful roundtable with a large number of well-informed experts organised by my friend and neighbour Charles Grant, who directs the Centre for European Reform. I also travelled to Derby and Wakefield to speak to businesses, trade unions, and local representatives, as I have been doing across the country in the last 3 months. 

Meanwhile, no word yet on when the Supreme Court will give its judgement in the Article 50 case. What we do know is that when it happens things will begin to move very fast! 

More next week. 

Keir