Morning Call: pick of the papers

Ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

Why I, as a journalist and ex-editor, believe it is time to regulate the press (Observer

Will Hutton gives his support to the forthcoming Leveson report.


Despite the sabre-rattling, an attack on Iran is now unlikely (Independent on Sunday


Patrick Cockburn explains why it's now too late for Israel to destroy Iran's nuclear facilities.


Gaza grabs the headlines as Congo once more descends into chaos (Observer


Ian Birrell calls for the world to pay more attention to the rebel takeover of Goma.


The first law of social work: politics trumps parental love (Sunday Times) (£) 


Minette Marin comments on the recent case of social workers removing a child from foster parents who were members of UKIP.


Unlike Europe, the Tories can bind together (Sunday Telegraph


Janet Daley excoriates the European governing class.


I see one last, if faint, hope for a truly free British press (Sunday Telegraph


Matthew D'Ancona argues that Cameron should offer the press "one last chance".


Why Dave doesn't give a hoot about the EU budget (Independent on Sunday


John Rentoul argues that Cameron is right to pursue a "wait-and-see" policy on Europe.


David Cameron's boldness over Europe does him credit (Sunday Telegraph


Iain Martin praises Cameron's tough stance during the EU budget negotiations.


Houdini Dave can slip the Leveson trap (Sunday Times) (£) 


Martin Ivens calls for a voluntary regulatory arrangement among newspapers.


Buck up Britain - regrets are mere whinges (Sunday Times) (£) 


India Knight says she has no time in life for regrets.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.