Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It's Palestinians who have the right to defend themselves (Guardian)

Gazans are an occupied people and have the right to resist, including by armed force, says Seumas Milne.

2. A Terrible Failure (Times) (£)

The Church of England’s vote against women bishops does a disservice to half the population, says a Times leader.

3. This energy debate threatens to tear the coalition apart (Daily Telegraph)

Negotiations over the forthcoming Energy Bill have stirred up poisonous political divisions, writes Mary Riddell.

4. We’re all in this together, including savers (Financial Times)

If Osborne is to be both fair and smart, richer people must take the strain, writes Paul Goodman

5. The protests against austerity have failed. We have to try another way (Independent)

We must present a coherent alternative that resonates with people who live outside the political bubble, says Owen Jones.

6. Syrians may be better off without cheerleaders (Guardian)

Recognising the rebels won't mean the end of Assad, says James Harkin. That's not what the Gulf states want.

7. Israel demands our support because it fights its ‘war against terrorists’ in our name (Independent)

We westerners set the precedent when it comes to "collateral damage", now the Israelis are reeling out the same tired excuses, writes Robert Fisk.

8. Expenses revelations leave a nasty taste (Daily Telegraph)

Speaker John Bercow’s over-zealous attempts to 'protect' MPs have had the opposite effect, says a Telegraph editorial.

9. It's elementary, Cameron. If you want to win in 2015, pick the right fights (Daily Mail)

Lynton Crosby should advise the PM not to start a fight unless he's sure he can win it, says Andrew Alexander.

10. The monumental folly of rent-seeking (Financial Times)

The success of market economies is not achieved by policies that encourage greed, writes John Kay.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.