Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the morning papers.

1. Medieval, barbaric — a woman’s death to shame even the Pope (Sunday Times) (£)

India Knight on the tragic death of Savita Halappanavar.

2. Elections: if you can't be bothered to vote, the person most to blame is you (Observer)

Politicians and the media share some of the responsibility for low turnouts, but the public is guilty too, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Ed Miliband is facing his Clause Four moment (Sunday Telegraph)

The Labour leader’s remarks are not a conversion to Euroscepticism, writes Matthew D'Ancona.

4. Need help? Call in the wedge wizard (Sunday Times) (£)

David Cameron has arrived at his Thatcher moment, says Martin Ivens.

5. Things must be bad when even Gove disagrees (Independent on Sunday)

Almost invisibly, collective ministerial responsibility has broken down, says John Rentoul.

6. And now, without the aid of a safety net, it's Dave on the EU high-wire! (Mail on Sunday)

Europe will dominate British politics this week, says James Forsyth.

7. Matrimonial tax breaks: paying people to marry is divorced from any reality (Observer)

MPs who want to reward marriage through tax are expressing their unreasonable horror of the many who don't conform, says Catherine Bennett.

8. We’re heading for economic dictatorship (Sunday Telegraph)

The whole of the West is falling into the economic black hole of permanent no-growth, says Janet Daley.

9. Dragging us into a futile war is a job for the political blowhards, General - not YOU (Mail on Sunday)

Afghanistan is not worth the life of one more British soldier, writes Peter Hitchens.

10. Back to basics for the BBC (Independent on Sunday)

We should focus on accountability, or, rather, the lack of it, says Janet Street-Porter.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.