Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the morning papers.

1. Medieval, barbaric — a woman’s death to shame even the Pope (Sunday Times) (£)

India Knight on the tragic death of Savita Halappanavar.

2. Elections: if you can't be bothered to vote, the person most to blame is you (Observer)

Politicians and the media share some of the responsibility for low turnouts, but the public is guilty too, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Ed Miliband is facing his Clause Four moment (Sunday Telegraph)

The Labour leader’s remarks are not a conversion to Euroscepticism, writes Matthew D'Ancona.

4. Need help? Call in the wedge wizard (Sunday Times) (£)

David Cameron has arrived at his Thatcher moment, says Martin Ivens.

5. Things must be bad when even Gove disagrees (Independent on Sunday)

Almost invisibly, collective ministerial responsibility has broken down, says John Rentoul.

6. And now, without the aid of a safety net, it's Dave on the EU high-wire! (Mail on Sunday)

Europe will dominate British politics this week, says James Forsyth.

7. Matrimonial tax breaks: paying people to marry is divorced from any reality (Observer)

MPs who want to reward marriage through tax are expressing their unreasonable horror of the many who don't conform, says Catherine Bennett.

8. We’re heading for economic dictatorship (Sunday Telegraph)

The whole of the West is falling into the economic black hole of permanent no-growth, says Janet Daley.

9. Dragging us into a futile war is a job for the political blowhards, General - not YOU (Mail on Sunday)

Afghanistan is not worth the life of one more British soldier, writes Peter Hitchens.

10. Back to basics for the BBC (Independent on Sunday)

We should focus on accountability, or, rather, the lack of it, says Janet Street-Porter.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.