Morning Call: pick of the papers

Ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers

1. The BBC's real crime was to act like the Catholic Church (Guardian)

The Corporation's instincts when confronted with allegations of child abuse were all wrong, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. Alex Salmond faces a sceptical nation (FT)

Kiran Stacey profiles the SNP leader.

3. Slowly the Tories are embracing ever looser union (Telegraph)

Charles Moore welcomes the tendency for leading Conservatives to flirt with quitting the European Union.

4. 'If the economy comes right, we'll sail home' (Telegraph)

Revealing interview with Ken Clarke, minister for giving revealing interviews.

5. No escape from energy firm bullies (Daily Mail

Mail editorial gets frothy about dysfunctional consumer energy market, without failing to note foreign ownership of companies in question.

6. Our plans for the next election (ConservativeHome)

Tory chairman Grant Shapps breaks with his past by revealing a winning strategy online under his own name.

7. The benefits of being in this together (FT)

Brisk, insightful guide to tax and benefit changes causing George Osborne a political headache, by Tim Harford

8. Too much poverty and joblessness? Blame newborn babies (Guardian)

Tory plans to limit child benefit wilfully and vindictiely miss the point, says Tanya Gold.

9. How scared should you be of President Romney (Independent)

Indie editorial generously decides that the Republican candidate might not turn out to be a monster.

10. Sadly a hung parliament has no oomph! (Independent)

Chris Bryant MP complains about the state of the legislature, among other things, not for the first time.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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