Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Economic crisis isn't over yet. This may not even be the beginning of the end (Guardian)

Statistically, the UK is out of recession – but it took an Olympian effort to achieve even this fragile upturn, writes Larry Elliott.

2. Gordon Brown’s secret army could defeat the coalition’s welfare and education reforms (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s charities and quangos are now stuffed to the gunwales with Labour placemen, says Fraser Nelson.

3. There is no ‘unishambles’ in education (Independent)

The government's university reforms are putting a new focus on the student experience, promoting opportunity and helping reduce the public deficit, argues David Willetts.

4. Look out, wolves. The little pigs’ time is here (Times) (£)

Whether you’re Man Utd manager, Chief Whip or BBC boss, don’t expect deference any more, writes Gaby Hinsliff.

5. This withering assault on farm workers' wages is a race to the bottom (Guardian)

Farming is the last sector where pay rates have some level of protection, and now that is under threat, writes Polly Toynbee. Labour, take note.

6. Turkey stumbles on the road to Damascus (Financial Times)

Ankara has come to realise that it has been overtaken by events, writes Philip Stephens.

7. Good news for the economy at last... now can we cut taxes? (Daily Mail)

Osborne must recognise that high taxes are the enemy of enterprise and growth, says Alex Brummer.

8. Whether it’s the Hutton Report or Jimmy Savile, the BBC is hopeless in a crisis (Daily Telegraph)

Peter Rippon of Newsnight has been hung out to dry as his BBC bosses play the blame game, writes Andrew Gilligan.

9. The threat to local government's heroic, civilising role (Guardian)

Brutal cuts and the demands of core provision put services such as museums, parks and community halls at huge risk, says Tristram Hunt.

10. If the City of London loses the trust of the people it serves, whether home or abroad, it's finished (Independent)

Customers are not to be thought of as sales targets but as people with whom the institution aims to have a mutually profitable relationship, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

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Ignored by the media, the Liberal Democrats are experiencing a revival

The crushed Liberals are doing particularly well in areas that voted Conservative in 2015 - and Remain in 2016. 

The Liberal Democrats had another good night last night, making big gains in by-elections. They won Adeyfield West, a seat they have never held in Dacorum, with a massive swing. They were up by close to the 20 points in the Derby seat of Allestree, beating Labour into second place. And they won a seat in the Cotswolds, which borders the vacant seat of Witney.

It’s worth noting that they also went backwards in a safe Labour ward in Blackpool and a safe Conservative seat in Northamptonshire.  But the overall pattern is clear, and it’s not merely confined to last night: the Liberal Democrats are enjoying a mini-revival, particularly in the south-east.

Of course, it doesn’t appear to be making itself felt in the Liberal Democrats’ poll share. “After Corbyn's election,” my colleague George tweeted recently, “Some predicted Lib Dems would rise like Lazarus. But poll ratings still stuck at 8 per cent.” Prior to the local elections, I was pessimistic that the so-called Liberal Democrat fightback could make itself felt at a national contest, when the party would have to fight on multiple fronts.

But the local elections – the first time since 1968 when every part of the mainland United Kingdom has had a vote on outside of a general election – proved that completely wrong. They  picked up 30 seats across England, though they had something of a nightmare in Stockport, and were reduced to just one seat in the Welsh Assembly. Their woes continued in Scotland, however, where they slipped to fifth place. They were even back to the third place had those votes been replicated on a national scale.

Polling has always been somewhat unkind to the Liberal Democrats outside of election campaigns, as the party has a low profile, particularly now it has just eight MPs. What appears to be happening at local by-elections and my expectation may be repeated at a general election is that when voters are presented with the option of a Liberal Democrat at the ballot box they find the idea surprisingly appealing.

Added to that, the Liberal Democrats’ happiest hunting grounds are clearly affluent, Conservative-leaning areas that voted for Remain in the referendum. All of which makes their hopes of a good second place in Witney – and a good night in the 2017 county councils – look rather less farfetched than you might expect. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.