Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Economic crisis isn't over yet. This may not even be the beginning of the end (Guardian)

Statistically, the UK is out of recession – but it took an Olympian effort to achieve even this fragile upturn, writes Larry Elliott.

2. Gordon Brown’s secret army could defeat the coalition’s welfare and education reforms (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s charities and quangos are now stuffed to the gunwales with Labour placemen, says Fraser Nelson.

3. There is no ‘unishambles’ in education (Independent)

The government's university reforms are putting a new focus on the student experience, promoting opportunity and helping reduce the public deficit, argues David Willetts.

4. Look out, wolves. The little pigs’ time is here (Times) (£)

Whether you’re Man Utd manager, Chief Whip or BBC boss, don’t expect deference any more, writes Gaby Hinsliff.

5. This withering assault on farm workers' wages is a race to the bottom (Guardian)

Farming is the last sector where pay rates have some level of protection, and now that is under threat, writes Polly Toynbee. Labour, take note.

6. Turkey stumbles on the road to Damascus (Financial Times)

Ankara has come to realise that it has been overtaken by events, writes Philip Stephens.

7. Good news for the economy at last... now can we cut taxes? (Daily Mail)

Osborne must recognise that high taxes are the enemy of enterprise and growth, says Alex Brummer.

8. Whether it’s the Hutton Report or Jimmy Savile, the BBC is hopeless in a crisis (Daily Telegraph)

Peter Rippon of Newsnight has been hung out to dry as his BBC bosses play the blame game, writes Andrew Gilligan.

9. The threat to local government's heroic, civilising role (Guardian)

Brutal cuts and the demands of core provision put services such as museums, parks and community halls at huge risk, says Tristram Hunt.

10. If the City of London loses the trust of the people it serves, whether home or abroad, it's finished (Independent)

Customers are not to be thought of as sales targets but as people with whom the institution aims to have a mutually profitable relationship, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

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The problems with ending encryption to fight terrorism

Forcing tech firms to create a "backdoor" to access messages would be a gift to cyber-hackers.

The UK has endured its worst terrorist atrocity since 7 July 2005 and the threat level has been raised to "critical" for the first time in a decade. Though election campaigning has been suspended, the debate over potential new powers has already begun.

Today's Sun reports that the Conservatives will seek to force technology companies to hand over encrypted messages to the police and security services. The new Technical Capability Notices were proposed by Amber Rudd following the Westminster terrorist attack and a month-long consultation closed last week. A Tory minister told the Sun: "We will do this as soon as we can after the election, as long as we get back in. The level of threat clearly proves there is no more time to waste now. The social media companies have been laughing in our faces for too long."

Put that way, the plan sounds reasonable (orders would be approved by the home secretary and a senior judge). But there are irrefutable problems. Encryption means tech firms such as WhatsApp and Apple can't simply "hand over" suspect messages - they can't access them at all. The technology is designed precisely so that conversations are genuinely private (unless a suspect's device is obtained or hacked into). Were companies to create an encryption "backdoor", as the government proposes, they would also create new opportunities for criminals and cyberhackers (as in the case of the recent NHS attack).

Ian Levy, the technical director of the National Cyber Security, told the New Statesman's Will Dunn earlier this year: "Nobody in this organisation or our parent organisation will ever ask for a 'back door' in a large-scale encryption system, because it's dumb."

But there is a more profound problem: once created, a technology cannot be uninvented. Should large tech firms end encryption, terrorists will merely turn to other, lesser-known platforms. The only means of barring UK citizens from using the service would be a Chinese-style "great firewall", cutting Britain off from the rest of the internet. In 2015, before entering the cabinet, Brexit Secretary David Davis warned of ending encryption: "Such a move would have had devastating consequences for all financial transactions and online commerce, not to mention the security of all personal data. Its consequences for the City do not bear thinking about."

Labour's manifesto pledged to "provide our security agencies with the resources and the powers they need to protect our country and keep us all safe." But added: "We will also ensure that such powers do not weaken our individual rights or civil liberties". The Liberal Democrats have vowed to "oppose Conservative attempts to undermine encryption."

But with a large Conservative majority inevitable, according to polls, ministers will be confident of winning parliamentary support for the plan. Only a rebellion led by Davis-esque liberals is likely to stop them.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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