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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Rather than prices, David Cameron should fix the energy mess (Guardian)

If a Tory prime minister can 'pass a law' on utility bills, then he can make a decision on where our power should come from, writes Simon Jenkins.

2. Brexit: Europe loses patience with London (Financial Times)

There have been many crises in the UK’s relationship with the EU, but this one feels different, writes Philip Stephens.

3. Elected police commissioners: a criminal waste of a good idea (Daily Telegraph)

Directly electing police commissioners was an arresting idea screwed up by our political masters, writes Fraser Nelson.

4. Britain does not have to accept stagnation (Financial Times)

There is no reason to persist with a flawed strategy and ignore other ideas, says Martin Wolf.

5. Today’s top jobs are too big for anyone (Independent)

Perhaps some bodies – the Bank of England, the BBC – are too complex to be managed successfully by any single individual, writes Mary Dejevsky.

6. Of all the wild Tory dogma, this cut-price baby farming is the worst (Guardian)

Liz Truss's plans for childcare on the cheap will undo all the progress Labour achieved on early-years education, says Polly Toynbee.

7. John Bercow has not kept his word on MPs’ expenses (Daily Telegraph)

If Parliament has cleaned up its act, the Speaker should not be suppressing information, says a Daily Telegraph leader.

8. Energy prices and a coalition shambles (Daily Mail)

If David Cameron wishes to restore the government’s reputation for competence, he is going a peculiar way about it, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. The Big Society comes naturally to America (Times) (£)

Welfare may be a dirty word in the US but community spirit and generosity fill the gap, writes Alexandra Frean.

10. Syria's future lies in ruins (Guardian)

To mourn Syria's devastated archaeological and architectural heritage may seem trivial, writes William Dalrymple. Yet with it die precious traditions.

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