Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why Europe is floundering (Guardian)

Its architects envisioned the EU as a model for the world, but current dogma will achieve the opposite, writes John Gray.

2. Why the Tories are ready to risk detonating the Brussels bomb (Daily Telegraph)

Withdrawal from the EU has changed from being a fringe view to mainstream opinion, writes Peter Oborne.

3. Behold, we have a new Sir Humphrey Appleby (Times) (£)

The Attorney-General’s specious reasons for not publishing Prince Charles’s letters are beyond parody, says David Aaronovitch.

4. The Prince of Wales must be free to give his opinions (Daily Telegraph)

Any minister will tell you that the confidence of the Crown is vital for the system to work, writes Jack Straw.

5. The Treasury doesn't know best (Guardian)

Labour rightly wants to reform over-mighty markets, writes David Miliband. But the state also needs to fundamentally change.

6. How much has austerity really cost? (Financial Times)

The contribution of severe deficit reduction is worthy of debate, says Chris Giles.

7. Banning teams is the way to tackle football racism (Independent)

Now is Uefa's chance to send an unequivocal message that there is no place for racism in football, says an Independent leader.

8. Watch out Westminster – council politics just got sexy (Guardian)

We may think we live in a centralised state, but decisions made by local authorities have real impact on our lives, says Zoe Williams.

9. This glimmer of hope could be far brighter (Daily Mail)

George Osborne should be doing far more to help firms seize the chances opening up to them, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. Malala paid dearly for claiming her right (Financial Times)

Countries that fail to educate females cause themselves incalculable damage, writes David Pilling.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.