Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Will Osborne dare to be radical when he appoints the next Governor of the Bank of England? (Independent)

The sheer power of modern Governors makes the Chancellor's decision momentous - which is why senior Lib Dems are so determined to have a say in it, writes Steve Richards.

2. On Trident, Miliband needs to be brave and jump ship (Guardian)

With the Tories and Lib Dems at odds over our cold-war nuclear defences, Labour has to forge a political third way, says Polly Toynbee.

3. An insidious threat to the right to know (Daily Mail)

The arrest of a Greek magazine editor for exposing allegations of tax dodging should alarm every democrat, says a Daily Mail editorial.

4. A day of judgment over the EU budget (Daily Telegraph)

The vote on the EU budget gives MPs a chance to follow in the steps of Margaret Thatcher, says Daniel Hannan.

5. Another good idea let down by neglect (Financial Times)

Reform of the police service is falling victim to an all too familiar sloppiness, writes Janan Ganesh.

6. Pilgrims’ Progress (Times) (£)

The Anglican tradition is a rich civic resource; a new Archbishop must not pit the Church against modernity, says a Times leader.

7. Hillsborough shows why we need a permanent truth commission (Guardian)

There's an urgent need for independent oversight of incidents of malpractice – and the Hillsborough panel could provide a model, writes Michael Mansfield.

8. Lebanon can heal divisions to deter Syria (Financial Times)

Assad’s attempt to exploit his neighbour’s divisions might have a unifying effect, writes David Gardner.

9. Dither and delay have put our forests at risk (Daily Telegraph)

The government is finally acting decisively against ash dieback disease, notes a Daily Telegraph editorial. Why not sooner?

10. John Prescott’s political survival is a miracle (Independent)

Despite his affair, incompetent policies and amateur boxing, the career of this former merchant navy seaman sails on, writes Dominic Lawson.

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Donald Trump's healthcare failure could be to his advantage

The appearance of weakness is less electorally damaging than actually removing healthcare from millions of people.

Good morning. Is it all over for Donald Trump? His approval ratings have cratered to below 40%. Now his attempt to dismantle Barack Obama's healthcare reforms have hit serious resistance from within the Republican Party, adding to the failures and retreats of his early days in office.

The problem for the GOP is that their opposition to Obamacare had more to do with the word "Obama" than the word "care". The previous President opted for a right-wing solution to the problem of the uninsured in a doomed attempt to secure bipartisan support for his healthcare reform. The politician with the biggest impact on the structures of the Affordable Care Act is Mitt Romney.

But now that the Republicans control all three branches of government they are left in a situation where they have no alternative to Obamacare that wouldn't either a) shred conservative orthodoxies on healthcare or b) create numerous and angry losers in their constituencies. The difficulties for Trump's proposal is that it does a bit of both.

Now the man who ran on his ability to cut a deal has been forced to make a take it or leave plea to Republicans in the House of Representatives: vote for this plan or say goodbye to any chance of repealing Obamacare.

But that's probably good news for Trump. The appearance of weakness and failure is less electorally damaging than actually succeeding in removing healthcare from millions of people, including people who voted for Trump.

Trump won his first term because his own negatives as a candidate weren't quite enough to drag him down on a night when he underperformed Republican candidates across the country. The historical trends all make it hard for a first-term incumbent to lose. So far, Trump's administration is largely being frustrated by the Republican establishment though he is succeeding in leveraging the Presidency for the benefit of his business empire.

But it may be that in the failure to get anything done he succeeds in once again riding Republican coattails to victory in 2020.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.