Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Green agenda is suffering under the Tories. Here's how we can put it back on the map (Independent)

The only way the environment is going to be forced back on the agenda is to make it a bread-and-butter issue: about jobs and living standards, says Owen Jones.

2. Newspapers are worth fighting for – even when they’re wrong (Daily Telegraph)

Our imperilled press has proved its value, says Boris Johnson. Don’t let over-regulation weaken it fatally.

3. Building blocks for America’s recovery (Financial Times)

Obama has recognised the inadequacy of demand as the main barrier to growth, writes Lawrence Summers.

4. Standing still isn’t enough. The EU needs cuts (Times) (£)

Europe must spend less and spend differently. But Britain has not put the case for reform, say Ed Balls and Douglas Alexander.

5. Another omnishambles – and this time it threatens me and my autistic son (Guardian)

The black hole of official indifference, now given official licence, threatens accountability and special needs provision, writes John Harris.

6. BBC’s Lord Smug has lost our Trust (Sun)

For all his experience, Chris Patten has mishandled this crisis from the moment it exploded, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. The president struggles to convince (Financial Times)

If Barack Obama wants to win the election, he could do more to show it, says Edward Luce.

8. The hidden danger of milking the motorist (Daily Mail)

Ministers have to be sure they do not cost the country more in lost jobs and lower growth than they gain in revenue, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. Neither Keynes nor the market will save Labour (Guardian)

Ed Miliband needs a clear economic alternative, says Jackie Ashley. His emphasis should not be on regulating business, but on democratising it.

10. Time to kick tobacco's butt (Independent)

More must be done to regulate the promotion and sale of so incontrovertibly damaging a product, argues an Independent leader.

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Watch Ian Paisley Jr thank Martin McGuinness for partnership that "saved lives"

The son of Ian Paisley said he "humbly" thanked the man who was both his father's enemy, and then friend. 

Northern Irish politics started 2017 at a low point. The First Minister, the Democratic Unionist Arlene Foster, is embroiled in scandal - so much so that her deputy, Sinn Féin's Martin McGuinness, resigned. Then McGuinness confirmed speculation that he was suffering from a serious illness, and would be resigning from frontline politics altogether. 

But as Ian Paisley Jr, the son of the Democratic Unionist founder Ian Paisley and a DUP politician himself, made clear, it is still possible to rise above the fray.

Paisley Sr, a firebrand Protestant preacher, opposed the Good Friday Agreement, but subsequently worked in partnership with his old nemesis, McGuinness, who himself was a former member of the IRA. Amazingly, they got on so well they were nicknamed "The Chuckle Brothers". When Paisley Sr died, McGuinness wrote that he had "lost a friend".

Speaking after McGuinness announced his retirement, Paisley Jr wished him good health, and then continued: 

"The second thing I'm going to say is thank you. I think it's important that we actually do reflect on the fact we would not be where we are in Northern Ireland in terms of having stability, peace and the opportunity to rebuild our country, if it hadn't been for the work he did put in, especially with my father at the beginning of this long journey.

"And I'm going to acknowledge the fact perhaps if we got back to some of that foundation work of building a proper relationship and recognising what partnership actually means, then we can get out of the mess we're currently in."

Questioned on whether other unionists "dont really get it", Paisley Jr retorted that it was time to move on: "Can we please get over that. Everyone out there has got over it. We as the political leaders have to demonstrate by our actions, by our words, and by our talk that we're over that."

He said he was thanking McGuinness "humbly" in recognition of "the remarkable journey" he had been on. The partnership government had "not only saved lives, but has made lives of countless people in Northern Ireland better", he said. 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.