Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Green agenda is suffering under the Tories. Here's how we can put it back on the map (Independent)

The only way the environment is going to be forced back on the agenda is to make it a bread-and-butter issue: about jobs and living standards, says Owen Jones.

2. Newspapers are worth fighting for – even when they’re wrong (Daily Telegraph)

Our imperilled press has proved its value, says Boris Johnson. Don’t let over-regulation weaken it fatally.

3. Building blocks for America’s recovery (Financial Times)

Obama has recognised the inadequacy of demand as the main barrier to growth, writes Lawrence Summers.

4. Standing still isn’t enough. The EU needs cuts (Times) (£)

Europe must spend less and spend differently. But Britain has not put the case for reform, say Ed Balls and Douglas Alexander.

5. Another omnishambles – and this time it threatens me and my autistic son (Guardian)

The black hole of official indifference, now given official licence, threatens accountability and special needs provision, writes John Harris.

6. BBC’s Lord Smug has lost our Trust (Sun)

For all his experience, Chris Patten has mishandled this crisis from the moment it exploded, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. The president struggles to convince (Financial Times)

If Barack Obama wants to win the election, he could do more to show it, says Edward Luce.

8. The hidden danger of milking the motorist (Daily Mail)

Ministers have to be sure they do not cost the country more in lost jobs and lower growth than they gain in revenue, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. Neither Keynes nor the market will save Labour (Guardian)

Ed Miliband needs a clear economic alternative, says Jackie Ashley. His emphasis should not be on regulating business, but on democratising it.

10. Time to kick tobacco's butt (Independent)

More must be done to regulate the promotion and sale of so incontrovertibly damaging a product, argues an Independent leader.

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The Future of the Left: trade unions are more important than ever

Trade unions are under threat - and without them, the left has no future. 

Not accepting what you're given, when what you're given isn't enough, is the heart of trade unionism.

Workers having the means to change their lot - by standing together and organising is bread and butter for the labour movement - and the most important part? That 'lightbulb moment' when a group of workers realise they don't have to accept the injustice of their situation and that they have the means to change it.

That's what happened when a group of low-paid hospital workers organised a demonstration outside their hospital last week. As more of their colleagues clocked out and joined them on their picket, thart lightbulb went on.

When they stood together, proudly waving their union flags, singing a rhythmic chant and raising their homemade placards demanding a living wage they knew they had organised the collective strength needed to win.

The GMB union members, predominantly BAME women, work for Aramark, an American multinational outsourcing provider. They are hostesses and domestics in the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, a mental health trust with sites across south London.

Like the nurses and doctors, they work around vulnerable patients and are subject to verbal and in some cases physical abuse. Unlike the nurses and doctors their pay is determined by the private contractor that employs them - for many of these staff that means statutory sick pay, statutory annual leave entitlement and as little as £7.38 per hour.

This is little more than George Osborne's new 'Living Wage' of £7.20 per hour as of April.

But these workers aren't fighting for a living wage set by government or even the Living Wage Foundation - they are fighting for a genuine living wage. The GMB union and Class think tank have calculated that a genuine living wage of £10ph an hour as part of a full time contract removes the need for in work benefits.

As the TUC launches its 'Heart Unions' week of action against the trade union bill today, the Aramark workers will be receiving ballot papers to vote on whether or not they want to strike to win their demands.

These workers are showing exactly why we need to 'Heart Unions' more than ever, because it is the labour movement and workers like these that need to start setting the terms of the real living wage debate. It is campaigns like this, low-paid, in some cases precariously employed and often women workers using their collective strength to make demands on their employer with a strategy for winning those demands that will begin to deliver a genuine living wage.

It is also workers like these that the Trade Union Bill seeks to silence. In many ways it may succeed, but in many other ways workers can still win.

Osborne wants workers to accept what they're given - a living wage on his terms. He wants to stop the women working for Aramark from setting an example to other workers about what can be achieved.

There is no doubting that achieving higher ballot turn outs, restrictions on picket lines and most worryingly the use of agency workers to cover strikers work will make campaigns like these harder. But I refuse to accept they are insurmountable, or that good, solid organisation of working people doesn't have the ability to prevail over even the most authoritarian of legislation.

As the TUC launch their Heart Unions week of action against the bill these women are showing us how the labour movement can reclaim the demands for a genuine living wage. They also send a message to all working people, the message that the Tories fear the most, that collective action can still win and that attempts to silence workers can still be defeated.