Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Green agenda is suffering under the Tories. Here's how we can put it back on the map (Independent)

The only way the environment is going to be forced back on the agenda is to make it a bread-and-butter issue: about jobs and living standards, says Owen Jones.

2. Newspapers are worth fighting for – even when they’re wrong (Daily Telegraph)

Our imperilled press has proved its value, says Boris Johnson. Don’t let over-regulation weaken it fatally.

3. Building blocks for America’s recovery (Financial Times)

Obama has recognised the inadequacy of demand as the main barrier to growth, writes Lawrence Summers.

4. Standing still isn’t enough. The EU needs cuts (Times) (£)

Europe must spend less and spend differently. But Britain has not put the case for reform, say Ed Balls and Douglas Alexander.

5. Another omnishambles – and this time it threatens me and my autistic son (Guardian)

The black hole of official indifference, now given official licence, threatens accountability and special needs provision, writes John Harris.

6. BBC’s Lord Smug has lost our Trust (Sun)

For all his experience, Chris Patten has mishandled this crisis from the moment it exploded, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. The president struggles to convince (Financial Times)

If Barack Obama wants to win the election, he could do more to show it, says Edward Luce.

8. The hidden danger of milking the motorist (Daily Mail)

Ministers have to be sure they do not cost the country more in lost jobs and lower growth than they gain in revenue, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. Neither Keynes nor the market will save Labour (Guardian)

Ed Miliband needs a clear economic alternative, says Jackie Ashley. His emphasis should not be on regulating business, but on democratising it.

10. Time to kick tobacco's butt (Independent)

More must be done to regulate the promotion and sale of so incontrovertibly damaging a product, argues an Independent leader.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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