Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Green agenda is suffering under the Tories. Here's how we can put it back on the map (Independent)

The only way the environment is going to be forced back on the agenda is to make it a bread-and-butter issue: about jobs and living standards, says Owen Jones.

2. Newspapers are worth fighting for – even when they’re wrong (Daily Telegraph)

Our imperilled press has proved its value, says Boris Johnson. Don’t let over-regulation weaken it fatally.

3. Building blocks for America’s recovery (Financial Times)

Obama has recognised the inadequacy of demand as the main barrier to growth, writes Lawrence Summers.

4. Standing still isn’t enough. The EU needs cuts (Times) (£)

Europe must spend less and spend differently. But Britain has not put the case for reform, say Ed Balls and Douglas Alexander.

5. Another omnishambles – and this time it threatens me and my autistic son (Guardian)

The black hole of official indifference, now given official licence, threatens accountability and special needs provision, writes John Harris.

6. BBC’s Lord Smug has lost our Trust (Sun)

For all his experience, Chris Patten has mishandled this crisis from the moment it exploded, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. The president struggles to convince (Financial Times)

If Barack Obama wants to win the election, he could do more to show it, says Edward Luce.

8. The hidden danger of milking the motorist (Daily Mail)

Ministers have to be sure they do not cost the country more in lost jobs and lower growth than they gain in revenue, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. Neither Keynes nor the market will save Labour (Guardian)

Ed Miliband needs a clear economic alternative, says Jackie Ashley. His emphasis should not be on regulating business, but on democratising it.

10. Time to kick tobacco's butt (Independent)

More must be done to regulate the promotion and sale of so incontrovertibly damaging a product, argues an Independent leader.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.