Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband is about to give Labour the shock of its life (Daily Telegraph)

After his successful conference speech, the Labour leader is planning to get tough with his party, says Mary Riddell.

2. At last! A minister stands up to Uncle Sam (Daily Mail)

It is not every day one can say that a senior minister has acted bravely and done the right thing, writes Stephen Glover.

3. Theresa May has set an uneasy precedent (Daily Telegraph)

May described the McKinnon affair as 'exceptional', notes a Telegraph leader. But it would be no surprise if its implications return to haunt future occupants of her post.

4. Voting yes will create a new Scotland (Guardian)

Independence will allow a proud country to take its seat at the top table, and on its own terms, says Alex Salmond.

5. The fund warns and encourages (Financial Times)

It is essential for the eurozone and the world that it sustains a healthy level of demand, writes Martin Wolf.

6. My son Gary McKinnon has won justice at last (Guardian)

Theresa May's decision not to extradite Gary to the US on computer hacking charges is a victory for common sense, says Janis Sharp.

7. 140 reasons why politicians are out of touch (Times) (£)

They may not control the message, but MPs can still meet voters on the digital doorstep, writes Alastair Campbell.

8. Pro-choice – but not so pro-debate, it seems (Independent)

Those who argue for a 12 week limit for abortions don't deserve such a hate-filled response, says Christina Patterson. There's logic on their side, too.

9. It's drugs politics, not drugs policy, that needs an inquiry (Guardian)

The sanity of politicians in opposition turns into the darkest taboo in power, writes Simon Jenkins. This is the greatest failure of modern statecraft.

 

10. Peace prize sets off an unseemly scuffle (Financial Times)

Who will accept the award – and who will deliver the Nobel lecture, asks Peter Spiegel.

 

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.