Raheem Sterling put in a good performance. Photo: Getty
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England's impressive start to the World Cup: can they make it through the group of death?

Italy's star players prevailed, but Roy Hodgson's young team made a splash in their first game.

It is hard to remember England making a more impressive start in a major tournament, and hard also to feel other than encouraged by much of what we saw last night. From the moment that Raheem Sterling crashed his shot so narrowly wide in the opening minutes there was a feeling that this young side could achieve against the odds in their "group of death".

Italy are, however, experienced and tough competitors and it was the excellence of their star players that took them through. Hard, though, to disagree with Alan Shearer, who appears to have upped his game for the World Cup as a pundit in a way he never really did as a player, that Rooney's second-half miss was a crucial moment. "Wazza's" failure also to adapt to the defensive side of the role assigned to him left Baines regularly exposed down England's left flank. No doubt the press barons will give him no mercy, which is harsh since it was his superb cross that set up Sturridge's marvellous finish for England's quick-fire reply to Italy's well-worked opener. If there was scope for improvement in some aspects of the defensive performance, there was disappointment that our return from set pieces was minimal, whereas Italy threatened regularly from theirs.

So on to Thursday and Uruguay: the Suarez showdown. England's early contribution to this World Cup is so far impressive. Our young team have made a splash, Roy Hodgson demonstrates dignity and calm, looking perfectly at home at this level, keeping expectations to sensible proportions, and getting a real performance out of an inexperienced squad. On the political front Greg Dyke has emerged as a considerable figure on world football's administrative stage, a man of integrity leading Europe's challenge to Blatter's crass chicanery and deceit. In this respect we have taken the lead, and Germany with Beckenbauer, a sad disgraced figure, and Platini for UEFA and France compromised by his association with the Qatar bid have given us an unlikely starring role among Europe's superpowers.

Let us hope that our players have not given their best shot in defeat and the next two games give us an opportunity to make our presence felt at the highest and most important levels on the pitch. Come on England!

David Cameron addresses pupils at an assembly during a visit to Corby Technical School on September 2, 2015. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Can Cameron maintain his refugee stance as he comes under attack from all sides?

Tory MPs, the Sun, Labour and a growing section of the public are calling on the PM to end his refusal to take "more and more". 

The disparity between the traumatic images of drowned Syrian children and David Cameron's compassionless response ("I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees") has triggered a political backlash. A petition calling for greater action (the UK has to date accepted around 5,000) has passed the 100,000 threshold required for the government to consider a debate after tens of thousands signed this morning. Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson has tweeted: "This is not an immigration issue, it's a humanitarian one, and the human response must be to help. If we don't, what does that make us?" Tory MPs such as Nicola Blackwood, David Burrowes, Jeremy Lefroy and Johnny Mercer have similarly appealed to Cameron to reverse his stance.

Today's Sun declares that the UK has "a proud record of taking in desperate people and we should not flinch from it now if it is beyond doubt that they have fled for their lives." Meanwhile, the Washington Post has published a derisive piece headlined "Britain takes in so few refugees from Syria they would fit on a subway train". Labour has called on Cameron to convene a meeting of Cobra to discuss the crisis and to request an emergency EU summit. Yvette Cooper, who led the way with a speech on Monday outlining how the UK could accept 10,000 refugees, is organising a meeting of councils, charities and faith groups to discuss Britain's response. Public opinion, which can turn remarkably quickly in response to harrowing images, is likely to have grown more sympathetic to the Syrians' plight. Indeed, a survey in March found that those who supported accepting refugees fleeing persecution outnumbered opponents by 47-24 per cent. 

The political question is whether this cumulative pressure will force Cameron to change his stance. He may not agree to match Cooper's demand of 10,000 (though Germany is poised to accept 800,000) but an increasing number at Westminster believe that he cannot remain impassive. Surely Cameron, who will not stand for election again, will not want this stain on his premiership? The UK's obstinacy is further antagonising Angela Merkel on whom his hopes of a successful EU renegotiation rest. If nothing else, Cameron should remember one of the laws of politics: the earlier a climbdown, the less painful it is. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.