Think that everything in a black hole gets swallowed up, never to be seen again? Well, you're half right

What happens to the information in a black hole once it disappears? Stephen Hawking thought he knew, betted on it, and lost.

Young people? Nothing but trouble. If you don’t believe the politicians, just look at physicists’ current anguish over the question of what is lost when stuff falls into a black hole. We are now in the middle of a huge crisis of confidence, just because the kids couldn’t keep their ideas to themselves.
 
If you think that stuff in a black hole just gets swallowed up, never to be seen again, you’re half right. The stuff is indeed gone. Yet the information about the stuff can’t be. In the 1970s, a young Stephen Hawking showed that, due to a quirk of quantum theory, black holes don’t just swallow; they also spit. A trail of particles is emitted from a black hole over its lifetime. As a result, the black hole eventually loses so much energy that it evaporates and disappears from the universe. According to Hawking’s theory, those particles contain no information of any kind, so the original information is lost once the black hole disappears.
 
However, a fundamental law of physics states that information can’t be destroyed. In 1997, John Preskill of the California Institute of Technology was so confident that Hawking must be wrong that the pair entered into a bet. That year, a young theorist called Juan Maldacena showed that, as stuff fell in, the information could be caught on the “event horizon”, the spherical surface of a black hole. With the information residing on the event horizon, it isn’t erased from the universe and might eventually leak back out.
 
Maldacena’s work was convincing enough for Hawking to concede. In 2004, he bought Preskill a baseball encyclopaedia (for reasons we won’t go into here) and the bet was considered settled.
 
Then, in 2010, along came the vibrant young mind of Mark Van Raamsdonk. His work has led to the new debate over the “cosmic firewall”. For information on the event horizon to leak back into the universe, there has to be a layer of ultra-high-energy particles – a firewall – just inside the event horizon. Each particle taking information from the event horizon has what Albert Einstein once termed a “spooky” link with a particle in the firewall. The link is called “entanglement” and it means that you can’t fully describe one of the particles unless you have information that resides in the other.
 
The problem is, the nature of Hawking’s original result shows that the particle on the outside of the event horizon also has to be entangled with another particle, one that carried away a little information from the black hole some time in the past. And a single particle can’t share that kind of entanglement with two others. So Maldacena’s idea doesn’t work. The best solution anyone can come up with involves another entanglement, this time between the particle inside the firewall and the particle that left the black hole all that time ago. That particular spooky link resolves the problem because those two entangled particles are actually one and the same.
 
It’s a classic Shakespearean twist. The whole problem has been a case of mistaken identity: the cosmic firewall story is the Twelfth Night of cosmology. However, most physicists don’t like this ending. Resolving all these entanglements stretches credulity too far, they say. The resolution they prefer is to acknowledge that this whole shebang exposes a gaping hole in our understanding of the universe. Maybe, they say, we need to start again.
 
While they scratch their heads and wonder what to do, Hawking could justifiably ask for his encyclopaedia back. If Preskill has any sense of how to play the foiled schemer, he’ll reluctantly hand it over while muttering something about those pesky kids. 
 
Michael Brooks’s “The Secret Anarchy of Science” is published by Profile Books (£7.99) 
In 1997 Hakwing made a bet with John Preskill of the California Institute of Technology - and lost. Photograph: Andrew Burman/Evevine/Contrasto.

Michael Brooks holds a PhD in quantum physics. He writes a weekly science column for the New Statesman, and his most recent book is At the Edge of Uncertainty: 11 Discoveries Taking Science by Surprise.

This article first appeared in the 02 September 2013 issue of the New Statesman, Syria: The west humiliated

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An antibiotic-resistant superbug is silently spreading through UK hospitals

There have already been outbreaks in Manchester, London, Edinburgh, and Birmingham, but deaths are not centrally recorded. 

Lying in a hospital bed, four months pregnant, Emily Morris felt only terror. She had caught a urinary tract infection and it was resistant to common antibiotics. Doctors needed to treat it as it could harm the baby, but the only drugs that could work hadn’t been tested on pregnant women before; the risks were unknown. Overwhelmed, Emily and her husband were asked to make a decision. A few hours later, gripping each other’s arms, they decided she should be given the drugs.

In Emily’s case, the medicine worked and her son Emerson (pictured below with Emily) was born healthy. But rising antibiotic resistance means people are now suffering infections for which there is no cure. Doctors have long warned that decades of reliance on these drugs will lead to a "post-antibiotic era"– a return to time where a scratch could kill and common operations are too risky.

It sounds like hyperbole – but this is already a reality in the UK. In the last four years 25 patients have suffered infections immune to all the antibiotics Public Health England tests for in its central lab, the Bureau of Investigative Journalism has discovered.

While these cases are rare, reports of a highly resistant superbug are rising, and infection control doctors are worried. Carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are not only difficult to pronounce, but deadly. These are bugs that live in the human gut but can cause an infection if they get into the wrong place, like the urinary tract or a wound. They have evolved to become immune to most classes of antibiotics – so if someone does become infected, there are only a few drugs that will still work. If CRE bacteria get into the bloodstream, studies show between 40 per cent and 50 per cent of people die.

These bugs are causing huge problems in India, certain parts of Asia, the Middle East and some countries in southern Europe. Until recently, most infections were seen in people who had travelled abroad, had family members who had, or had been in a foreign hospital. The boom in cheap cosmetic surgery in India was blamed for a spate of infections in Britain.

Now, doctors are finding people who have never boarded a plane are carrying the bug. There have already been outbreaks in Manchester, London, Liverpool, Leeds, Edinburgh, Birmingham, Nottingham, Belfast, Dublin and Limerick among other areas. Patients found with CRE have to be treated in side rooms in hospital so the bacteria does not spread and harm other vulnerable patients. But in many of Britain’s Victorian-built hospitals, single rooms are in sparse supply. Deaths from CRE aren’t centrally recorded by the government - but it is thought hundreds have already died. 

Across the country, doctors are being forced to reach for older, more toxic drugs to treat these infections. The amount of colistin – called the "last hope" antibiotic as it is one of few options still effective against CRE infections - rose dramatically in English hospitals between 2014 and 2015, the Bureau has revealed. Colistin was taken off the shelves soon after it was introduced, as it can harm the kidneys and nervous system in high doses, but was reintroduced when infections became immune to standard treatment. The more we use colistin the more bacteria develop resistance to it. It’s only a matter of time before it stops working too, leaving doctors’ arsenal near-empty when it comes to the most dangerous superbug infections.

Due to a kidney problem, Emily Morris suffers repeat urinary tract infections and has to be hospitalised most months. Her son Emerson comes to visit her, understanding his mummy is ill. If she catches a superbug infection, she can still be given intravenous antibiotics to stem it. But she worries about her son. By the time he is an adult, if he gets ill, there may be no drugs left that work.

Madlen Davies is a health and science reporter for the Bureau of Investigative Journalism