Helpful as they are, there is a limit to what can be achieved politically with your mobile phone. Photo: Getty
Leader: Twitter politics is no substitute for ideas and strong campaigns
By New Statesman - 04 April 14:51

There is good reason to suspect that much of the energy spent on online campaigning is wasted entrenching divisions or preaching aggressively to an already zealous choir.

Living a life online: kids glued to their smartphones. Photo: Getty
How can we end cyberbullying?
By Rhiannon and Holly - 04 April 10:23

Let's start by ditching the word "cyber bullying" - this isn't a new phenomenon, but it is harder for parents and teachers to deal with than harassment and abuse than occurs offline.

Jane Goodall: “I don't think anyone who knows me could accuse me of plagiarism”
By Henry Nicholls - 01 April 11:00

As Jane Goodall turns 80, Henry Nicholls talks to her about her remarkable career studying chimpanzee behaviour, her animal welfare activism, and accusations of plagiarism in her latest book.

Why, when we say "I'll just stay for one", does that never turn out to be the case? Photo: Getty
Peering through beer goggles: the pub that wants to improve your health
By Caroline Crampton - 28 March 12:56

Psychologists at London South Bank University have cunningly disguised a lab as a pub in order to research our drinking habits.

Not so new: K-pop band Big Bang perform in Seoul, March 2012. (Photo: Getty)
The Big Bang theory is not as modern as you think
By Michael Brooks - 27 March 10:00

We have fooled ourselves into thinking that modern science began with Newton but Grosseteste wrote his treatise in 1225.

Sound and vision: Krafwerk perform in New York, 2012. (Photo: Getty)
Having trouble with your vision? There’s an app for that
By Michael Brooks - 26 March 14:03

EyeMusic will allow you to hear shapes and colours

San Jose in Silicon Valley. Photo: Getty
The brutal ageism of tech: meet Silicon Valley’s obsolete workforce
By Noam Scheiber - 24 March 12:34

In the one corner of the American economy defined by its relentless optimism, there is now a large and growing class of highly trained, objectively talented, surpassingly ambitious workers who are shunted to the margins.

Majestic flight: hawks have been considered sacred in cultures throughout history.
Hawk eyed: how to write about birds of prey
By John Burnside - 20 March 10:00

From sacred symbolism in ancient mythology to paeans by 20th-century naturalists, hawks and eagles have always been lauded in art and literature.

Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh. (Photo: Tom Pilston)
Life and death at his fingertips: watching a brain surgeon at work
By Erica Wagner - 20 March 10:00

Henry Marsh is one of the country's top neurosurgeons and a pioneer of neurosurgical advances in Ukraine. Erica Wagner witnesses life on a knife-edge.

“Innovation” is no substitute for a robust technology policy. Photo: Getty
The innovation fetish
By Evgeny Morozov - 19 March 13:42

Left, right, and centre – everyone loves to talk about “innovation”. But what does it mean, this ambiguous, ill-defined buzzword?

A woman in Greenland tends a potato crop. The country has seen a dramatic shrinkage in ice recently. (Photo: Getty)
Who’s afraid of the big, bad virus? Perils from beneath the Arctic ice
By Michael Brooks - 19 March 10:10

The melting of Arctic permafrost is reawakening millennia-buried pathogens. But it’s the release of methane we should be more worried about.

A warning sign at a former Royal Mail sorting office in London. Photo: Getty
Killer dust: why is asbestos still killing people?
By Nic Fleming - 18 March 11:55

Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

Baidu's suggested search feature is very revealing.
What Baidu’s search autofill reveals about the soul of the average Chinese web surfer
By Christopher Beam - 14 March 12:54

“What do I do if I'm ugly?”, and other questions.

Could a plane like this disappear? Photo: Getty.
Five theories to explain how Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 could have disappeared
By Michael Oakes - 13 March 14:41

With no mayday call, no data and no wreckage found, conspiracy-style theories as to how Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared seem increasingly plausible. Planes don't disappear. Or do they?

Sandra Bullock goes for a spacewalk in Gravity. (Photo: Warner Bros)
In search of the notorious Big G: why we still know so little about gravity
By Michael Brooks - 13 March 9:00

Gravity is pathetic and so is our understanding of it.

Florence Nightingale in Scutari hospital during the Crimean War. Photo: Getty Images
Beautiful Science at the British Library: a history of the portrayal of data
By Michael Brooks - 06 March 10:00

A highlight is Florence Nightingale’s rose diagram, showing how dirty hospitals were killing more soldiers than war.

Statins. Photo: Getty
Why the stats about statins don't tell the whole story
By Phil Whitaker - 06 March 10:00

For those without the relevant risk factors, statins aren't the wonder-pill they've been sold as by the media.

Electronic terminals are taking over the casino floors in Las Vegas. Photo: Getty
Addiction as art: How gambling machines – and the digital world – put us in “the machine zone”
By Ian Leslie - 06 March 9:44

A quiet revolution has taken place in gambling, with electronic terminals finely-tuned into the perfect devices for parting you from your money. Rather than thrilling you, they lull you into a calm, machine-like state that gives the illusion of control.

Caterpillars. Photo: Getty
Got a cold? Eat caterpillars
By Michael Brooks - 28 February 8:34

Why medinical zinc is not all it's cracked up to be.

Test image from Gaia: Slightly shaky to start with, but it’ll get there. (Image: ESA/DPAC/Airbus DS)
Largest ever space camera is ready to map a billion stars
By Ben Dryer - 26 February 16:31

The European Space Agency's Gaia telescope is so powerful, it see stars with power akin to measuring the width of a human hair at a distance of 500 km.

Shade of things to come.
Who owns the moon? We're just going to have to get up there and find out
By Michael Brooks - 25 February 10:00

A legal loophole has made it impossible to say who can claim the moon - but with a wealth of minerals and "rare earth" elements, plus huge potential for space exploration, we'll have to get up there and fight it out.

A crowd of people experiencing a reality mediated via technology. (Image: Getty)
The mindfulness racket: the evangelists of unplugging might just have another agenda
By Evgeny Morozov - 24 February 16:44

"Our debate about distraction has hinged on the assumption that the feelings of anxiety and personal insecurity that we experience when interacting with social media are the natural price we pay for living in what some technology pundits call 'the attention economy'."

Mars headlines Woodstock
Death on Mars: would you take a one-way trip into space?
By Helen Lewis - 24 February 10:08

Within a few decades, we will have the technological ability to send humans to the red planet - as long as they don't want to come back home again.

A smiley face in the sky. Photo: Getty
Your emoticon addiction may actually make people like you more
By Alice Robb - 20 February 14:45

Emoticons are a new and evolving form of language, and they are producing new patterns of brain activity.

Measure of a man: will robots ever have the capacity to feel human emotions?
Reprogramming science fiction: the genre that is learning to love
By Andrew Harrison - 20 February 11:28

From Battlestar Galactica to Spike Jonze’s new film Her, modern science fiction is growing up and humanising.

A London opium den in the 1870s, by Gustav Doré. Image: Hulton Archive/Getty
Queen Victoria on cannabis, and all the other things you never knew about drugs
By Steven Poole - 19 February 14:09

Modern governments have long demonised drugs, but the world now may be inching its way back towards the more rational view held in the 19th century.

Social media and the second Hillsborough inquest
By David Banks - 14 February 12:30

The depth of feeling that exists about the disaster and what came after is entirely understandable. The attorney general has a difficult task ahead deciding what consititutes contempt of court in this unique circumstance.

Facebook introduces choice of 50 genders – but why can't we write in our own?
By Abigail Brady - 14 February 9:54

The move has been acclaimed as a big step forward, but it was a deliberate and recent policy decision by Facebook to have imposed a gender binary, and the new options still don't give you the chance to write in your own.

The sexually transmitted dog cancer that could tell us how tumours develop
By Michael Brooks - 11 February 13:30

The mutations of canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT) promises to show how the tumours develop and respond to environmental pressures.

Watch where you put that emoticon AND KEEP YOUR VOICE DOWN
By Erika Darics - 07 February 17:47

When it comes to writing online, we’re all still working it out as we go along.

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