Nations can no longer afford to go it alone on cyber-security
By Ian Brown - 02 November 13:08

Cyber-crime knows know borders, so nor should our defences.

Big mother is watching you, kids
By Judith Shulevitz - 02 November 12:37

Technology now lets you spy on your kids all the time. This is why you shouldn't.

New Statesman
Why is the act of urban walking so revolutionary?
By John Rogers - 31 October 14:18

What both the interwar topographers and the situationists recognised was the transformative potential of large numbers of people regularly stepping outside the matrix, taking to the streets and walking, becoming active participants rather than passive spe

New Statesman
Diablo Cody: How would religious people react to life on Mars?
By Diablo Cody - 31 October 13:43

If a bunch of freaky-looking extraterrestrials actually made contact with us, I think that might blow a few minds. Can you imagine the reality show? ‘What happens when this Kansas family befriends a sassy Uranian? Here Comes Beezeltron XV14.’

New Statesman
Why we could soon see a revolution in our understanding of the universe
By Michael Brooks - 31 October 13:35

The biggest known star in the universe is about to blow. This kind of thing doesn't happen every day - and when it does, something extremely interesting usually happens.

New Statesman
Would you have any ethical qualms about controlling a cockroach's brain?
By Michael Brooks - 24 October 14:33

The RoboRoach will be marketed to US kids from November. It has always seemed mystifying that researchers struggle to see the thorny side of their technologies.

Bebo.
Can Michael Birch bring Bebo back?
By Sophie McBain - 24 October 7:40

After selling the company he co-founded in 2008 for $850million, Michael Birch bought it back this year for just $1m - but is it too late to save Bebo?

It's hard to stop businesses tracking your smartphone
By Ian Steadman - 21 October 11:01

It's a lot easier to stop advertisers tracking your browsing habits online than it is to stop people sniffing out your smartphone's location.

Hurrah, we've found an asteroid that might kill us all in 2032
By Ian Steadman - 18 October 12:58

2013 TV135 is meant to be a 410m space rock of death, but it's OK - there's a 99.998% chance it'll miss us.

If everything's being automated, let's hope we'll like our robots
By Ian Steadman - 17 October 16:35

The robots may be taking our jobs - even making our coffee - but that doesn't mean we'll be fond of them.

New Statesman
Japan’s Yankee genius, the greatest scientist you've never heard of
By Michael Brooks - 17 October 15:27

Ovshinsky created a hatful of world-changing innovations, many of which threatened the dominance of America’s great new invention: the transistor. US corporate interests rubbished his work and he ended up licensing his technologies to a few small Japanese

No, climate change will not be good for the world
By Duncan Geere - 17 October 11:41

While there are benefits to higher global temperatures, they are vastly outweighed by the costs to human life.

Predicting the text in redacted documents is close to reality
By Ian Steadman - 17 October 9:50

Releasing delicate information with big black bars all over it has kept secrets safe for years - but not for much longer, maybe.

Goodbye to the real trip advisor: Silk Road's top LSD review team just retired
By Ian Steadman - 16 October 11:17

A group calling themselves The Avengers were a bit like the Yelp of buying acid online.

Man explodes strawberry using power of his mind live on TV
By Ian Steadman - 16 October 9:19

A hitherto unforeseen side effect of headsets like Google Glass could be Uri Geller-like powers.

Finding a blood-filled mosquito doesn't mean we can recreate Jurassic Park
By Ian Steadman - 15 October 15:50

Scientists have discovered a preserved mosquito like the one from that dinosaur film for the first time, but alas, dino-cloning will still be impossible.

Bitcoin may be let loose now Silk Road has been shut down
By Ian Steadman - 15 October 10:00

Now that Silk Road has closed without any discernible damage to Bitcoin's value, maybe we can accept it's here to stay.

New Statesman
Where does the moon come from?
By Michael Brooks - 10 October 15:16

Whether we’re trying to find out where it came from, or how to siphon off some of its energy, grappling with the moon is harder than it looks.

What the internet does, and doesn't, know about you
By Paul Rosenzweig - 07 October 16:39

For years, a large data aggregator has quietly, behind the scenes, been gathering your information—as one writer put it “mapping the consumer genome.” Some saw this as rather ominous; others as just curious. But it was, for all of us, mysterious. Until no

New Statesman
What makes us alive? Moreover, what makes us dead?
By Michael Brooks - 02 October 8:05

When it comes to death, science is part of the problem as well as part of the solution. Deepening our understanding of the body’s processes and learning how to keep them going longer has complicated and obfuscated the end of life.

New Statesman
The teenage hormone that triggers puberty and prevents cancer
By Michael Brooks - 26 September 16:05

The appropriately named kisspeptin was discovered by accident, and has some surprising effects.

If you know you’re right, then does it matter if you make up the numbers?
By Robert De Vries - 26 September 10:16

The Tories have always had disdain for scientific evidence - and the situation is getting worse.

New Statesman
What Nokia should do next
By Sophie McBain - 19 September 8:55

Rather than mimicking Apple or Samsung smartphones in North America and Europe, Nokia should look through its archives - and to its success in Africa - for inspiration.

New Statesman
Meet the man who wants total unemployment for all human beings in the world
By Michael Brooks - 19 September 8:45

Hugh Loebner is offering researchers $100,000 to develop a computer that thinks like a human. But is that really the best use of artificial intelligence?

New Statesman
Papers, Please: Why make a computer game about border control?
By Leigh Alexander - 16 September 14:41

'Papers, Please' is an oddly compelling and thought-provoking triumph.

Eve player.
Politics from cyberspace: Welcome to the world of Eve
By Simon Parkin - 12 September 8:55

The virtual worlds of video games hold lessons for the real one. We could learn a lot about how to organise our politics by studying the best video games grounded in democracy, writes Simon Parkin.

Can the Ministry of Sound sue Spotify – and should they?
By Alex Hern - 05 September 15:37

There's a copyright in playlists, argues the dance music label, and Alex Hern agrees.

Spirit
Has the time come for self-destructing tweets?
By Siraj Datoo - 05 September 14:03

A new service for twitter lets you add a snapchat-like timer to tweets. Is this what we need to get people to take privacy seriously, asks Siraj Datoo?

Apple's iOS 7 isn't for you. But you should upgrade anyway
By Alex Hern - 05 September 9:55

The secret target of Apple's new iOS releases is developers. But that doesn't mean users don't get benefits.

Forty years until we get "personal nanofactories"?
By James Evans - 03 September 18:15

A prominent futurist has predicted that in just forty years, we'll be able to produce anything from the basic building-blocks of matter itself.

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