An expanding colony of Clostridium difficile bacteria. Image: CC-BY: David Goulding, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute/Wellcome Images
We need to talk about poo (and how it could save your life)
By Bryn Nelson - 29 April 17:29

Bryn Nelson gets to the bottom of an emerging – and often shocking – therapy.

The clock is ticking. Photo: Getty
Men don’t last very long in bed – and it bothers them more than it bothers women
By Alice Robb - 25 April 12:42

Reports suggest that “an astonishing 45 per cent of men finish the sex act too quickly”.

Soon, you won't even need a liquid to get drunk. Photo: Getty
Powdered alcohol will appeal to young drinkers, despite what the makers say
By Jane Binakonsky - 25 April 9:44

Alcohol in powdered sachet form: what could possibly go wrong?

 A visitor views a digital representation of the human genomeat the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Photo: Getty
Life itself is encrypted – but can you find the Easter eggs?
By Adam Rutherford - 22 April 13:03

Art and science both had a long history of secret codes hidden in plain sight. Adam Rutherford goes on the hunt.

Antonio Meno Ortega (R) is cared for by his parents Juana (L) and Antonio (C) in November 2010. He has been in a persistent vegetative state since a botched nose operation in 1989. Photo: Getty Images
Reading the minds of those trapped in their own bodies, unable to ask for help
By Roger Highfield - 22 April 12:35

Thousands remain trapped between life and death. Three scientists are working to free them. Roger Highfield reports.

The City Toastmaster using a megaphone at the 1908 London Olympics. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images
How capital letters became internet code for shouting
By Alice Robb - 17 April 16:04

And why we should lay off the caps-lock key.

The cultural riches online are seemingly infinite - will they be there forever? Photogragh: Erik Söderström on Flickr via Creative Commons
What’s the rush? Why the internet means we never get round to doing anything
By Oliver Farry - 17 April 12:53

Speed is of the essence in the online world but faced with the Aladdin’s cave of cultural riches, one’s response is invariably one of sluggishness, of planning for a putative future that will never come.

That sox: Samsung got into water for using David Ortiz of Boston Red Sox's selfie with the Prez. Photo: Getty
Who actually owns your selfies?
By Ian Steadman - 17 April 11:30

Barack Obama is the president of the United States of America and neither he (nor his image) is supposed to be used to endorse a product.

Welcome to the age of synthetic biology – it’s all about yeast
By Michael Brooks - 17 April 10:00

We don’t need evolution any more – we've outsourced the processes to ourselves.

Hungary’s cold war with polio
By Penny Bailey - 15 April 10:17

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

Teenagers at an Alicia Keys concert wave their phones in the air. Photo:Getty
Stop worrying: teenagers are not internet-addled cyborgs with overdeveloped thumbs
By Helen Lewis - 15 April 9:15

. . .  in fact, they are probably better at navigating a world of smartphones and social networks than we crusties aged 20 and over.

Dazzling stripes are a way of deterring flies. Photo: Getty
How the zebra got its stripes
By Akshat Rathi and Angela White - 11 April 16:34

A method for dodging predators? A means of social interaction? Or a way of getting rid of flies?

Home of code: Old Street roundabout in London, AKA Silicon Roundabout. Photo: Getty
Learn a foreign language - code
By Ian Steadman - 10 April 17:09

The governent's Year of Code campaign has caused come confusion, but they could be missing a trick.

South Australian outback. There is very poor network coverage in much of the country. Photo: Getty
Australia’s grand vision for a national broadband network has shrunk
By Mary Hamilton - 10 April 16:27

Big coastal cities do not always get good coverage, let alone the outback.

Moving image: filmmaker Anthony Powell has yet to find cold-beating tech solutions on his feet. Image: Anthony Powell for his film "Antarctica: A Year on Ice"
What happens when your dishwasher breaks down in Antarctica?
By Caroline Crampton - 10 April 15:12

When you're living at the bottom of the world, you can’t just pop out to a hardware shop when something breaks, so your appliances are like part of the family.

The Large Hadron Collider, on the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. Photo: Getty Images
The Large Hadron Collider has made another exciting quantum discovery
By Harry Cliff - 10 April 11:48

Scientists working on one of the four experiments at the LHC have gathered enough evidence to confirm the existence of a four-quark particle.

Why futurologists are always wrong – and why we should be sceptical of techno-utopians
By Bryan Appleyard - 10 April 10:00

From predicting AI within 20 years to mass-starvation in the 1970s, those who foretell the future often come close to doomsday preachers.

Helpful as they are, there is a limit to what can be achieved politically with your mobile phone. Photo: Getty
Leader: Twitter politics is no substitute for ideas and strong campaigns
By New Statesman - 04 April 14:51

There is good reason to suspect that much of the energy spent on online campaigning is wasted entrenching divisions or preaching aggressively to an already zealous choir.

Living a life online: kids glued to their smartphones. Photo: Getty
How can we end cyberbullying?
By Rhiannon and Holly - 04 April 10:23

Let's start by ditching the word "cyber bullying" - this isn't a new phenomenon, but it is harder for parents and teachers to deal with than harassment and abuse than occurs offline.

Jane Goodall: “I don't think anyone who knows me could accuse me of plagiarism”
By Henry Nicholls - 01 April 11:00

As Jane Goodall turns 80, Henry Nicholls talks to her about her remarkable career studying chimpanzee behaviour, her animal welfare activism, and accusations of plagiarism in her latest book.

Why, when we say "I'll just stay for one", does that never turn out to be the case? Photo: Getty
Peering through beer goggles: the pub that wants to improve your health
By Caroline Crampton - 28 March 12:56

Psychologists at London South Bank University have cunningly disguised a lab as a pub in order to research our drinking habits.

Not so new: K-pop band Big Bang perform in Seoul, March 2012. (Photo: Getty)
The Big Bang theory is not as modern as you think
By Michael Brooks - 27 March 10:00

We have fooled ourselves into thinking that modern science began with Newton but Grosseteste wrote his treatise in 1225.

Sound and vision: Krafwerk perform in New York, 2012. (Photo: Getty)
Having trouble with your vision? There’s an app for that
By Michael Brooks - 26 March 14:03

EyeMusic will allow you to hear shapes and colours

San Jose in Silicon Valley. Photo: Getty
The brutal ageism of tech: meet Silicon Valley’s obsolete workforce
By Noam Scheiber - 24 March 12:34

In the one corner of the American economy defined by its relentless optimism, there is now a large and growing class of highly trained, objectively talented, surpassingly ambitious workers who are shunted to the margins.

Majestic flight: hawks have been considered sacred in cultures throughout history.
Hawk eyed: how to write about birds of prey
By John Burnside - 20 March 10:00

From sacred symbolism in ancient mythology to paeans by 20th-century naturalists, hawks and eagles have always been lauded in art and literature.

Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh. (Photo: Tom Pilston)
Life and death at his fingertips: watching a brain surgeon at work
By Erica Wagner - 20 March 10:00

Henry Marsh is one of the country's top neurosurgeons and a pioneer of neurosurgical advances in Ukraine. Erica Wagner witnesses life on a knife-edge.

“Innovation” is no substitute for a robust technology policy. Photo: Getty
The innovation fetish
By Evgeny Morozov - 19 March 13:42

Left, right, and centre – everyone loves to talk about “innovation”. But what does it mean, this ambiguous, ill-defined buzzword?

A woman in Greenland tends a potato crop. The country has seen a dramatic shrinkage in ice recently. (Photo: Getty)
Who’s afraid of the big, bad virus? Perils from beneath the Arctic ice
By Michael Brooks - 19 March 10:10

The melting of Arctic permafrost is reawakening millennia-buried pathogens. But it’s the release of methane we should be more worried about.

A warning sign at a former Royal Mail sorting office in London. Photo: Getty
Killer dust: why is asbestos still killing people?
By Nic Fleming - 18 March 11:55

Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

Baidu's suggested search feature is very revealing.
What Baidu’s search autofill reveals about the soul of the average Chinese web surfer
By Christopher Beam - 14 March 12:54

“What do I do if I'm ugly?”, and other questions.

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