Free again: Doctorow signals the danger of states pushing tech boundaries. Photo: Rex/Will Ireland/Future Publishing
Betrayed by your smartphone: Cory Doctorow on the future of internet censorship
By Ian Steadman - 09 October 10:00

“Information doesn’t want to be free,” writes the sci-fi novelist and activist Cory Doctorow, “people want to be free.”

Hope injection: women with their pets at a rabies vaccination centre in India. Photo: Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images
Preventing rabies: the dog jabs that can save humans
By Michael Brooks - 09 October 10:00

Responsibility for treatment of infected people falls on human health services. It is difficult to create an alliance against rabies until animal and human health experts co-ordinate.

The High Line in New York. Photo: Getty
New York’s High Line was the city planner’s Holy Grail. SkyCycle could be the answer for London
By Ed Smith - 03 October 9:10

London may be better served by embracing a different transport infrastructure project, one that follows the High Line principle of transforming what is already there.

Workers on Crossrail breakthrough into the Whitechapel station which forms part of the Crossrail network on April 04, 2014 in London, England. Photo: Getty Images
Britain needs to stop discouraging women from choosing engineering as a career
By Fiona Rutherford - 02 October 17:47

A new report suggests that women are lost to a potential career in engineering at the age of 16, when A-level and vocational subject choices are made – More needs to be done to challenge society’s clichéd attitudes and expectations of “masculine” and “feminine” career paths.

The implications of this research is profound. Photo: Getty
Is it a man or a mouse?
By Michael Brooks - 02 October 9:00

Scientists have a simple recipe for creating a more human-like mouse: just alter its DNA very slightly.

Illustration: Darrel Rees/Heart
Apocalypse soon: the scientists preparing for the end times
By Sophie McBain - 25 September 11:00

A growing community of scientists, philosophers and tech billionaires believe we need to start thinking seriously about the threat of human extinction.

Plumb role: actors dressed as Nintendo characters Super Mario and Luigi in Chiba, Tokyo, August 2014. Photo: Getty
The most influential tech company you’ve never heard of
By Philip Maughan - 25 September 10:00

The scientists and engineers at “Alca-Loo”– as it is known among financiers – think of themselves as “the plumbers of the internet world”.

ISRO’s successful mission control room. Photo: EPA
Billion people hold their breath as India becomes the first Asian country to reach Mars
By John Bridges - 24 September 11:52

Mars has become the destination of choice for ambitious space agencies and nations. Now India is among that group.

Not that kind of fishing. Photo: Getty
The psychology of phishing: why do we fall for terrible email scams?
By Emma Woollacott - 23 September 12:36

New research suggests that it isn’t the technologically illiterate who fall for the promise of a legacy from a Nigerian prince – the more you use Facebook, the more likely you are to click that link.

A scientist looks for microbiological pathogens in samples of water. (Photo credit Patrick Kovarik /AFP/GettyImages)
Science journal Nature Communications joins the open access movement
By Fiona Rutherford - 23 September 9:41

Nature Communications will be the first Nature-branded open access-only journal - a huge step in the right direction for the progression of scientific communication.

Part of a new permanent exhibition at the Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie in Paris dedicated to the human brain. Photo: Getty
How it is possible to live fairly normally with half your brain missing
By Michael Brooks - 22 September 11:10

Chinese researchers have recently reported a case of a woman found to have no cerebellum, a part of the brain that usually contains half of its neurons.

Staffs at Ainsworth Pharmacy make up homeopathic remedies (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
It's unscientific for a medical regulatory body to give accreditation to homeopaths
By Fiona Rutherford - 18 September 17:12

Homeopaths can now get their "medicine" accredited by an official regulatory body, to the dismay of critics.

A row of traditional American mailboxes. Photo: Andrew Taylor/Flickr
Reprivatising the internet: how physics helps you hide from spooks
By Michael Brooks - 18 September 10:00

Tim Berners-Lee has publicly called for programmers to develop better, more user-friendly cryptography. That way, he says, we can all get back to living private lives again.

How many bricks would it take to build a Lego bridge connecting London to New York?
By Randall Munroe - 17 September 12:30

An extract from What If? Serious scientific answers to absurd hypothetical questions by Randall Munroe, the creator of the wonderful web comic xkcd.

Starry, starry night: the Perseid meteor shower seen from Burma, 2013. Photo: Getty
Pleiades row: the fault in our star measurements
By Michael Brooks - 11 September 10:00

Either our understanding of how stars form needs a big overhaul, or one of the current missions of the European Space Agency could turn out to be something of a white elephant.

Newly-discovered dinosaur is the biggest land animal found so far
By Fiona Rutherford - 05 September 13:57

Dreadnoughtus schrani, which walked the earth 77 million years ago, is the largest land animal ever known – dwarfing such monsters as Diplodocus and Tyrranosaurus Rex.

The Sun, seen from the International Space Station. Photo: STS-129/Nasa
The curious case of space plankton
By Ian Steadman - 04 September 9:29

It’s increasingly becoming clear that space is a more hospitable environment than was assumed.

A Eurasian jay picks at a nut in northeastern Germany. Photo: Getty
Jay joy: what it feels like for a bird
By Michael Brooks - 02 September 17:00

Attributing emotions to birds is not a flight of fancy. Emotions are a feature of evolution: they arose to help creatures navigate the world safely and with maximum reward.

The logo of Apple's iCloud service, which is suspected to be at the centre of the celebrity image leak scandal. Image: Apple
The iCloud leak: weak security isn't only a problem for Apple's backup service
By Lauren Razavi - 02 September 15:11

Apple's cloud backup service, iCloud, has emerged as a likely weak link in the leaking of personal photographs of celebrities this week - but with online security, there are many possible ways for sensitive personal information to leak.

Crushed by the wheels of industry: critics increasingly see new tech as one of the free market's most dangerous tools of oppression. Image: Ikon Images
The new Luddites: why former digital prophets are turning against tech
By Bryan Appleyard - 29 August 15:18

Neo-Luddism began to emerge in the postwar period. First after the emergence of nuclear weapons, and secondly when it became apparent new computer technologies had the power to change our lives completely.

Students follow a lesson in a biology laboratory at the Roma Tre university (Photo credit: Tizani/AFP/Getty Images)
Scientists criticise new “open access” journal which limits research-sharing with copyright
By Fiona Rutherford - 29 August 13:22

Restrictive copyright licenses and expensive submission fees have led to a significant number of scientists to criticise Science Advances, a new journal due to launch next year, for failing to live up to its open access principles.

Miranda July.
Miranda July’s new app Somebody delivers text messages in person
By Philip Maughan - 29 August 12:42

“Every relationship becomes a three-way,” July says of the new app, which launched yesterday at the Venice Film Festival.

A Fermilab scientist works on the laser beams at the heart of the Holometer experiment. Photo: Fermilab
Particle accelerator experiment begins search for evidence that we live in a hologram
By Fiona Rutherford - 28 August 12:46

A US particle physics and accelerator laboratory recently announced an exciting new project to answer the question of whether our universe is a giant two-dimensional hologram.

A picture taken on August 17, 2013 shows the Cattenom nuclear power plant in Cattenom, northeastern France. Photo: AFP Photo/Jean-Christophe Verhaegen
Environmentalists must stop ignoring the needs of poor nations when combating global warming
By Amartya Sen - 25 August 12:23

Campaigns against pollution that causes climate change often focus on reducing energy usage, when poor countries desperately need that energy to give their citizens freer and fuller lives. A new ethical framework for evaluating environmental issues is needed.

An Orb-weaver spider (Araneus diadematus) in Rennes, western France (Photo: Damien Meyer/ AFP/Getty Images)
City living is making spiders bigger, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 22 August 12:49

According to new research, city-dwelling spiders are larger and more fertile than their rural-dwelling relatives.

Rapid responses and targeted messaging: Matthew McGregor. Photo: Micha Theiner/Eyevine
Labour’s most powerful weapon: its digital campaign
By Lucy Fisher - 21 August 15:45

Cooler, younger and tech savvy – meet the team led by Obama’s former digital strategist which Labour hopes will win it the election. 

Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux in “Blue is the Warmest Colour”.
Five theories as to why lesbians are more likely to orgasm than straight women
By Eleanor Margolis - 21 August 13:31

A recent study by the Kinsey Institute has found that lesbians are much more likely to orgasm during sex than either straight or bisexual women.

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen in a photo taken by the Rosetta spacecraft, 6 August. Photo: Getty
Hunting the rocky rubber duck: how comet-chasing Rosetta could change history
By Michael Brooks - 21 August 10:00

This ball of rock and ice formed at the same time as our solar system and should, if predictions are correct, contain complex organic molecules, the same stuff as terrestrial life is made from.

Doctor and a psychologist meet with members of a patient's family (Photo: Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)
Shy patients are more open about their health when talking to a robot AI, study finds
By Fiona Rutherford - 20 August 14:03

A recent study is the first study to demonstrate that 'virtual humans' could help patients overcome psychological barriers to honesty in medical interviews especially for sensitive, personal and highly stigmatized topics - these findings could prevent potentially serious consequences for the patient’s health, such as incorrect diagnosis.

An Apple iPad with Twitter's native app. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
Twitter's taking away your control over what tweets you choose to see
By Ian Steadman - 20 August 12:38

A subtle change in how Twitter's feed works will make some people very angry, but most people probably won't even notice.

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